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Voice of America, On '24,' TV Hero Jack Bauer Fights Terrorists, 1 Hour at a Time

On '24,' TV Hero Jack Bauer Fights Terrorists, 1 Hour at a Time

HOST:

Welcome to AMERICAN MOSAIC, in VOA Special English.

(MUSIC)

I'm Doug Johnson. On our show this week:

We answer a question about an American television show

HOST:

Our listener question this week comes from Osaka, Japan. Fumio Nishimoto says the television show "24'' is popular in Japan and wants to know more about it. "24" is also still very popular in the United States. The show is now in its sixth year on the Fox Television network. Some critics think more Americans will watch the show this season than ever before.

"24" stars Kiefer Sutherland (pictured) as Jack Bauer, an anti-terrorism agent of the United States government. Jack Bauer has fought nuclear threats, suicide bombers and kidnappers who have seized people he loves.

His work has resulted in the death of his wife and the end of his relationship with his daughter. It also places him in danger and in severe pain.

"24" is what is called a concept show. It uses one interesting artistic device. Each episode covers one hour in Jack Bauer?s life. And the episodes are all connected. So a full season of ?24? completes one twenty-four hour day.

Early on, some critics thought the twenty-four hour idea would get tiresome. But, the show continues to be popular among critics and viewers.

"24" deals with current issues and often disputed ones as well. For example, the use of torture as a method for gaining information is a major subject on the show. Other subjects are religious freedom and constitutional rights in the United States. And almost every episode includes some kind of disloyalty or violating a trust.

Imagine Television, Real Time Productions and Fox Television jointly produce "24." The show has received many honors, including an Emmy award last year for Outstanding Drama Series. Keifer Sutherland also received a two thousand six Emmy for outstanding lead actor in a drama series. He had been nominated every year since the show began.

Here is a tense moment from "24": ANNOUNCER: "The following takes place between 1 p. m. and 2 p. m." MILO PRESSMAN: "[Phone rings. ] Pressman." JACK BAUER: "They've dumped the car. They must have switched vehicles." MILO PRESSMAN: "From the underpass they could've merged directly onto any one of six local roads or highways. There's just no way of tracking them without knowing exactly which vehicle they're in." JACK BAUER: "Damn it, Milo. They could be anywhere. Just find them and get back to me." (MUSIC)

HOST:

I'm Doug Johnson. I hope you enjoyed our program today.

It was written by Shelley Gollust, Nancy Steinbach and Caty Weaver, who also was our producer. To read the text of this program and download audio, go to our Web site, voaspecialenglish.com.

And do join us again next week for AMERICAN MOSAIC, VOA?s radio magazine in Special English.


On '24,' TV Hero Jack Bauer Fights Terrorists, 1 Hour at a Time

HOST:

Welcome to AMERICAN MOSAIC, in VOA Special English.

(MUSIC)

I'm Doug Johnson. On our show this week:

We answer a question about an American television show

HOST:

Our listener question this week comes from Osaka, Japan. Fumio Nishimoto says the television show "24'' is popular in Japan and wants to know more about it. "24" is also still very popular in the United States. The show is now in its sixth year on the Fox Television network. Some critics think more Americans will watch the show this season than ever before.

"24" stars Kiefer Sutherland (pictured) as Jack Bauer, an anti-terrorism agent of the United States government. Jack Bauer has fought nuclear threats, suicide bombers and kidnappers who have seized people he loves.

His work has resulted in the death of his wife and the end of his relationship with his daughter. Его работа привела к смерти его жены и прекращению его отношений с дочерью. It also places him in danger and in severe pain.

"24" is what is called a concept show. It uses one interesting artistic device. Each episode covers one hour in Jack Bauer?s life. And the episodes are all connected. So a full season of ?24? completes one twenty-four hour day.

Early on, some critics thought the twenty-four hour idea would get tiresome. But, the show continues to be popular among critics and viewers.

"24" deals with current issues and often disputed ones as well. For example, the use of torture as a method for gaining information is a major subject on the show. Other subjects are religious freedom and constitutional rights in the United States. And almost every episode includes some kind of disloyalty or violating a trust.

Imagine Television, Real Time Productions and Fox Television jointly produce "24." The show has received many honors, including an Emmy award last year for Outstanding Drama Series. Keifer Sutherland also received a two thousand six Emmy for outstanding lead actor in a drama series. He had been nominated every year since the show began.

Here is a tense moment from "24": ANNOUNCER: "The following takes place between 1 p. m. and 2 p. m." MILO PRESSMAN: "[Phone rings. ] Pressman." JACK BAUER: "They've dumped the car. They must have switched vehicles." MILO PRESSMAN: "From the underpass they could've merged directly onto any one of six local roads or highways. There's just no way of tracking them without knowing exactly which vehicle they're in." JACK BAUER: "Damn it, Milo. They could be anywhere. Just find them and get back to me." (MUSIC)

HOST:

I'm Doug Johnson. I hope you enjoyed our program today.

It was written by Shelley Gollust, Nancy Steinbach and Caty Weaver, who also was our producer. To read the text of this program and download audio, go to our Web site, voaspecialenglish.com.

And do join us again next week for AMERICAN MOSAIC, VOA?s radio magazine in Special English.