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City Of Glass - New York Trilogy #1, City of Glass CD 03 parte II (3)

City of Glass CD 03 parte II (3)

“Was it some kind of literary thing you wanted to talk about?” Auster began.

“No,” said Quinn. “I wish it was. But this has nothing to do with literature.”

“With what, then?”

Quinn paused, looked around the room without seeing anything, and tried to start. “I have a feeling there's been a terrible mistake. I came here looking for Paul Auster, the private detective.”

“The what?” Auster laughed, and in that laugh everything was suddenly blown to bits. Quinn realized that he was talking nonsense. He might just as well have asked for Chief Sitting Bull—the effect would have been no different.

“The private detective,” he repeated softly.

“I'm afraid you've got the wrong Paul Auster.”

“You're the only one in the book.”

“That might be,” said Auster. “But I'm not a detective.”

“Who are you then? What do you do?”

“I'm a writer.”

“A writer?” Quinn spoke the word as though it were a lament.

“I'm sorry,” Auster said. “But that's what I happen to be.”

“If that's true, then there's no hope. The whole thing is a bad dream.”

“I have no idea what you're talking about.”

Quinn told him. He began at the beginning and went through the entire story, step by step. The pressure had been building up in him since Stillman's disappearance that morning, and it came out of him now as a torrent of words. He told of the phone calls for Paul Auster, of his inexplicable acceptance of the case, of his meeting with Peter Stillman, of his conversation with Virginia Stillman, of his reading Stillman's book, of his following Stillman from Grand Central Station, of Stillman's daily wanderings, of the carpetbag and the broken objects, of the disquieting maps that formed letters of the alphabet, of his talks with Stillman, of Stillman's disappearance from the hotel. When he had come to the end, he said, “Do you think I'm crazy?”

“No,” said Auster, who had listened attentively to Quinn's monologue. “If I had been in your place, I probably would have done the same thing.”

These words came as a great relief to Quinn, as if, at long last, the burden was no longer his alone. He felt like taking Auster in his arms and declaring his friendship for life.

“You see,” said Quinn, “I'm not making it up. I even have proof.” He took out his wallet and removed the five-hundred-dollar check that Virginia Stillman had written two weeks earlier. He handed it to Auster. “You see,” he said. “It's even made out to you.”

Auster looked the check over carefully and nodded. “It seems to be a perfectly normal check.”

“Well, it's yours,” said Quinn. “I want you to have it.”

“I couldn't possibly accept it.”

“It's of no use to me.” Quinn looked around the apartment and gestured vaguely. “Buy yourself some more books. Or a few toys for your kid.”

“This is money you've earned. You deserve to have it yourself. Auster paused for a moment. “There's one thing I'll do for you, though. Since the check is in my name, I'll cash it for you. I'll take it to my bank tomorrow morning, deposit it in my account, and give you the money when it clears.”

Quinn did not say anything.

“All right?” Auster asked. “Is it agreed?”

“All right,” said Quinn at last. “We'll see what happens.”

Auster put the check on the coffee table, as if to say the matter had been settled. Then he leaned back on the sofa and looked Quinn in the eyes. “There's a much more important question than the check,” he said. “The fact that my name has been mixed up in this. I don't understand it at all.”



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City of Glass CD 03 parte II (3)

“Was it some kind of literary thing you wanted to talk about?” Auster began. "¿Era algún tipo de cosa literaria de la que querías hablar?" comenzó Auster.

“No,” said Quinn. —No —dijo Quinn—. “I wish it was. "Ojalá lo fuera. But this has nothing to do with literature.” Pero esto no tiene nada que ver con la literatura”.

“With what, then?” "¿Con qué, entonces?"

Quinn paused, looked around the room without seeing anything, and tried to start. Quinn hizo una pausa, miró alrededor de la habitación sin ver nada y trató de comenzar. “I have a feeling there's been a terrible mistake. “Tengo la sensación de que ha habido un terrible error. I came here looking for Paul Auster, the private detective.” Vine aquí buscando a Paul Auster, el detective privado.

“The what?” Auster laughed, and in that laugh everything was suddenly blown to bits. "¿El qué?" Auster se echó a reír, y en esa risa todo se hizo añicos de repente. Quinn realized that he was talking nonsense. Quinn se dio cuenta de que estaba diciendo tonterías. He might just as well have asked for Chief Sitting Bull—the effect would have been no different. Bien podría haber preguntado por el jefe Toro Sentado: el efecto no habría sido diferente.

“The private detective,” he repeated softly. "El detective privado", repitió en voz baja.

“I'm afraid you've got the wrong Paul Auster.” "Me temo que te has equivocado de Paul Auster".

“You're the only one in the book.” "Eres el único en el libro".

“That might be,” said Auster. "Eso podría ser", dijo Auster. “But I'm not a detective.” Pero no soy detective.

“Who are you then? "¿Quien eres tu entonces? What do you do?” ¿A qué te dedicas?"

“I'm a writer.” "Soy escritor."

“A writer?” Quinn spoke the word as though it were a lament. "¿Un escritor?" Quinn pronunció la palabra como si fuera un lamento.

“I'm sorry,” Auster said. “Lo siento”, dijo Auster. “But that's what I happen to be.” “Pero eso es lo que soy”.

“If that's true, then there's no hope. “Si eso es cierto, entonces no hay esperanza. The whole thing is a bad dream.” Todo es un mal sueño.

“I have no idea what you're talking about.” "No tengo idea de lo que estás hablando".

Quinn told him. Quinn le dijo. He began at the beginning and went through the entire story, step by step. Empezó por el principio y repasó toda la historia, paso a paso. The pressure had been building up in him since Stillman's disappearance that morning, and it came out of him now as a torrent of words. La presión se había estado acumulando en él desde la desaparición de Stillman esa mañana, y ahora salía de él como un torrente de palabras. He told of the phone calls for Paul Auster, of his inexplicable acceptance of the case, of his meeting with Peter Stillman, of his conversation with Virginia Stillman, of his reading Stillman's book, of his following Stillman from Grand Central Station, of Stillman's daily wanderings, of the carpetbag and the broken objects, of the disquieting maps that formed letters of the alphabet, of his talks with Stillman, of Stillman's disappearance from the hotel. Habló de las llamadas telefónicas de Paul Auster, de su inexplicable aceptación del caso, de su encuentro con Peter Stillman, de su conversación con Virginia Stillman, de su lectura del libro de Stillman, de su seguimiento de Stillman desde Grand Central Station, del diario de Stillman. andanzas, de la cartera y los objetos rotos, de los inquietantes mapas que formaban las letras del alfabeto, de sus conversaciones con Stillman, de la desaparición de Stillman del hotel. When he had come to the end, he said, “Do you think I'm crazy?” Cuando llegó al final, dijo: "¿Crees que estoy loco?"

“No,” said Auster, who had listened attentively to Quinn's monologue. —No —dijo Auster, que había escuchado atentamente el monólogo de Quinn—. “If I had been in your place, I probably would have done the same thing.” “Si hubiera estado en tu lugar, probablemente habría hecho lo mismo”.

These words came as a great relief to Quinn, as if, at long last, the burden was no longer his alone. Estas palabras fueron un gran alivio para Quinn, como si, por fin, la carga ya no fuera solo suya. He felt like taking Auster in his arms and declaring his friendship for life. Tenía ganas de tomar a Auster en sus brazos y declararle su amistad de por vida.

“You see,” said Quinn, “I'm not making it up. “Ya ves”, dijo Quinn, “no me lo estoy inventando. I even have proof.” He took out his wallet and removed the five-hundred-dollar check that Virginia Stillman had written two weeks earlier. Incluso tengo pruebas. Sacó su billetera y sacó el cheque de quinientos dólares que Virginia Stillman había escrito dos semanas antes. He handed it to Auster. Se lo entregó a Auster. “You see,” he said. "Ya ves", dijo. “It's even made out to you.” Incluso está hecho a tu nombre.

Auster looked the check over carefully and nodded. Auster miró el cheque detenidamente y asintió. “It seems to be a perfectly normal check.” "Parece ser un cheque perfectamente normal".

“Well, it's yours,” said Quinn. "Bueno, es tuyo", dijo Quinn. “I want you to have it.” "Quiero que lo tengas."

“I couldn't possibly accept it.” "No podría aceptarlo".

“It's of no use to me.” Quinn looked around the apartment and gestured vaguely. "No me sirve de nada". Quinn miró alrededor del apartamento e hizo un gesto vago. “Buy yourself some more books. Cómprate algunos libros más. Or a few toys for your kid.” O algunos juguetes para tu hijo.

“This is money you've earned. “Este es dinero que te has ganado. You deserve to have it yourself. Te mereces tenerlo tú mismo. Auster paused for a moment. Auster hizo una pausa por un momento. “There's one thing I'll do for you, though. Sin embargo, hay una cosa que haré por ti. Since the check is in my name, I'll cash it for you. Como el cheque está a mi nombre, te lo cobraré. I'll take it to my bank tomorrow morning, deposit it in my account, and give you the money when it clears.” Lo llevaré a mi banco mañana por la mañana, lo depositaré en mi cuenta y te daré el dinero cuando se liquide”.

Quinn did not say anything. Quinn no dijo nada.

“All right?” Auster asked. "¿Está bien?" preguntó Auster. “Is it agreed?” "¿Está de acuerdo?"

“All right,” said Quinn at last. "Está bien", dijo Quinn por fin. “We'll see what happens.” "Veremos que pasa."

Auster put the check on the coffee table, as if to say the matter had been settled. Auster dejó el cheque sobre la mesa de café, como diciendo que el asunto estaba resuelto. Then he leaned back on the sofa and looked Quinn in the eyes. Luego se recostó en el sofá y miró a Quinn a los ojos. “There's a much more important question than the check,” he said. “Hay una cuestión mucho más importante que el cheque”, dijo. “The fact that my name has been mixed up in this. “El hecho de que mi nombre se haya mezclado en esto. I don't understand it at all.” No lo entiendo en absoluto.

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