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City Of Glass - New York Trilogy #1, City of Glass CD 03 parte II (1)

City of Glass CD 03 parte II (1)

“I needed him, you see. I had certain ideas at the time that were too dangerous and controversial. So I pretended they had come from someone else. It was a way of protecting myself.”

“How did you decide on the name Henry Dark?”

“It's a good name, don't you think? I like it very much. Full of mystery, and at the same time quite proper. It suited my purpose well. And besides, it had a secret meaning.”

“The allusion to darkness?”

“No, no. Nothing so obvious. It was the initials, H.D. That was very important.”

“How so?”

“Don't you want to guess?”

“I don't think so.”

“Oh, do try. Make three guesses. If you don't get it, then I'll tell you.”

Quinn paused for a moment, trying to give it his best effort. “H.D.,” he said. “For Henry David? As in Henry David Thoreau.”

“Not even close.”

“How about H.D. pure and simple? For the poet Hilda Doolittle.”

“Worse than the first one.”

“All right, one more guess. H.D. H…. and D…. Just a moment…. How about…. Just a moment…. Ah…. Yes, here we are. H for the weeping philosopher, Heraclitus…and D for the laughing philosopher, Democritus. Heraclitus and Democritus…the two poles of the dialectic.”

“A very clever answer.”

“Am I right?”

“No, of course not. But a clever answer just the same.”

“You can't say I didn't try.”

“No, I can't. That's why I'm going to reward you with the correct answer. Because you tried. Are you ready?”

“Ready.”

“The initials H.D. in the name Henry Dark refer to Humpty Dumpty.”

“Who?”

“Humpty Dumpty. You know who I mean. The egg.”

“As in ‘Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall'?”

“Exactly.”

“I don't understand.”

“Humpty Dumpty: the purest embodiment of the human condition. Listen carefully, sir. What is an egg? It is that which has not yet been born. A paradox, is it not? For how can Humpty Dumpty be alive if he has not been born? And yet, he is alive—make no mistake. We know that because he can speak. More than that, he is a philosopher of language. ‘When I use a word, Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less. The question is, said Alice, whether you can make words mean so many different things. The question is, said Humpty Dumpty, which is to be master—that's all.'”

“Lewis Carroll.”

“Through the Looking Glass, chapter six.”

“Interesting.”

“It's more than interesting, sir. It's crucial. Listen carefully, and perhaps you will learn something. In his little speech to Alice, Humpty Dumpty sketches the future of human hopes and gives the clue to our salvation: to become masters of the words we speak, to make language answer our needs. Humpty Dumpty was a prophet, a man who spoke truths the world was not ready for.”

“A man?”

“Excuse me. A slip of the tongue. I mean an egg. But the slip is instructive and helps to prove my point. For all men are eggs, in a manner of speaking. We exist, but we have not yet achieved the form that is our destiny. We are pure potential, an example of the not-yet-arrived. For man is a fallen creature—we know that from Genesis. Humpty Dumpty is also a fallen creature. He falls from his wall, and no one can put him back together again—neither the king, nor his horses, nor his men. But that is what we must all now strive to do. It is our duty as human beings: to put the egg back together again. For each of us, sir, is Humpty Dumpty. And to help him is to help ourselves.”

“A convincing argument.”

“It's impossible to find a flaw in it.”

“No cracks in the egg.”

“Exactly.”

“And, at the same time, the origin of Henry Dark.”

“Yes. But there is more to it than that. Another egg, in fact.”

“There's more than one?”

“Good heavens, yes. There are millions of them. But the one I have in mind is particularly famous. It's probably the most celebrated egg of all.”

“You're beginning to lose me.”

“I'm speaking of Columbus's egg.”

“Ah, yes. Of course.”

“You know the story?”

“Everyone does.”

“It's charming, is it not? When faced with the problem of how to stand an egg on its end, he merely tapped slightly on the bottom, cracking the shell just enough to create a certain flatness that would support the egg when he removed his hand.”

“It worked.”

“Of course it worked. Columbus was a genius. He sought paradise and discovered the New World. It is still not too late for it to become paradise.”

“Indeed.”

“I admit that things have not worked out too well yet. But there is still hope. Americans have never lost their desire to discover new worlds. Do you remember what happened in 1969?”

“I remember many things. What do you have in mind?”

“Men walked on the moon. Think of that, dear sir. Men walked on the moon!”

“Yes, I remember. According to the President, it was the greatest event since creation.”

“He was right. The only intelligent thing that man ever said. And what do you suppose the moon looks like?”

“I have no idea.”

“Come, come, think again.”

“Oh yes. Now I see what you mean.”

“Granted, the resemblance is not perfect. But it is true that in certain phases, especially on a clear night, the moon does look very much like an egg.”

“Yes. Very much like.”

At that moment, a waitress appeared with Stillman's breakfast and set it on the table before him. The old man eyed the food with relish. Decorously lifting a knife with his right hand, he cracked the shell of his soft-boiled egg and said, “As you can see, sir, I leave no stone unturned.”

The third meeting took place later that same day. The afternoon was well advanced: the light like gauze on the bricks and leaves, the shadows lengthening. Once again, Stillman retreated to Riverside Park, this time to the edge of it, coming to rest on a knobby outcrop at 84th Street known as Mount Tom. On this same spot, in the summers of 1843 and 1844, Edgar Allan Poe had spent many long hours gazing out at the Hudson. Quinn knew this because he had made it his business to know such things. As it turned out, he had often sat there himself.

He felt little fear now about doing what he had to do. He circled the rock two or three times, but failed to get Stillman's attention. Then he sat down next to the old man and said hello. Incredibly, Stillman did not recognize him. This was the third time Quinn had presented himself, and each time it was as though Quinn had been someone else. He could not decide whether this was a good sign or bad. If Stillman was pretending, he was an actor like no other in the world. For each time Quinn had appeared, he had done it by surprise. And yet Stillman had not even blinked. On the other hand, if Stillman really did not recognize him, what did this mean? Was it possible for anyone to be so impervious to the things he saw?

The old man asked him who he was.

“My name is Peter Stillman,” said Quinn.

“That's my name,” answered Stillman. “I'm Peter Stillman.”

“I'm the other Peter Stillman,” said Quinn.

“Oh. You mean my son. Yes, that's possible. You look just like him. Of course, Peter is blond and you are dark. Not Henry Dark, but dark of hair. But people change, don't they? One minute we're one thing, and then another another.”

“Exactly.”

“I've often wondered about you, Peter. Many times I've thought to myself, ‘I wonder how Peter is getting along.'”

“I'm much better now, thank you.”

“I'm glad to hear it. Someone once told me you had died. It made me very sad.”

“No, I've made a complete recovery.”

“I can see that. Fit as a fiddle. And you speak so well, too.”

“All words are available to me now. Even the ones most people have trouble with. I can say them all.”

“I'm proud of you, Peter.”

“I owe it all to you.”

“Children are a great blessing. I've always said that. An incomparable blessing.”

“I'm sure of it.”

“As for me, I have my good days and my bad days. When the bad days come, I think of the ones that were good. Memory is a great blessing, Peter. The next best thing to death.”

“Without a doubt.”

“Of course, we must live in the present, too. For example, I am currently in New York. Tomorrow, I could be somewhere else. I travel a great deal, you see. Here today, gone tomorrow. It's part of my work.”

“It must be stimulating.”

“Yes, I'm very stimulated. My mind never stops.”

“That's good to hear.”

“The years weigh heavily, it's true. But we have so much to be thankful for. Time makes us grow old, but it also gives us the day and the night. And when we die, there is always someone to take our place.”

“We all grow old.”

“When you're old, perhaps you'll have a son to comfort you.”

“I would like that.”

“Then you would be as fortunate as I have been. Remember, Peter, children are a great blessing.”

“I won't forget.”

“And remember, too, that you shouldn't put all your eggs in one basket. Conversely, don't count your chickens before they hatch.”

“No. I try to take things as they come.”

“Last of all, never say a thing you know in your heart is not true.”

“I won't.”

“Lying is a bad thing. It makes you sorry you were ever born. And not to have been born is a curse. You are condemned to live outside time. And when you live outside time, there is no day and night. You don't even get a chance to die.”

“I understand.”

“A lie can never be undone. Even the truth is not enough. I am a father, and I know about these things. Remember what happened to the father of our country. He chopped down the cherry tree, and then he said to his father, ‘I cannot tell a lie.' Soon thereafter, he threw the coin across the river. These two stories are crucial events in American history. George Washington chopped down the tree, and then he threw away the money. Do you understand? He was telling us an essential truth. Namely, that money doesn't grow on trees. This is what made our country great, Peter. Now George Washington's picture is on every dollar bill. There is an important lesson to be learned from all this.”

“I agree with you.”

“Of course, it's unfortunate that the tree was cut down. That tree was the Tree of Life, and it would have made us immune to death. Now we welcome death with open arms, especially when we are old. But the father of our country knew his duty. He could not do otherwise. That is the meaning of the phrase ‘Life is a bowl of cherries.' If the tree had remained standing, we would have had eternal life.”

“Yes, I see what you mean.”

“I have many such ideas in my head. My mind never stops. You were always a clever boy, Peter, and I'm glad you understand.”

“I can follow you perfectly.”

“A father must always teach his son the lessons he has learned. In that way knowledge is passed down from generation to generation, and we grow wise.”

“I won't forget what you've told me.”

“I'll be able to die happily now, Peter.”

“I'm glad.”

“But you musn't forget anything.”

“I won't, father. I promise.”

The next morning, Quinn was in front of the hotel at his usual time. The weather had finally changed. After two weeks of resplendent skies, a drizzle now fell on New York, and the streets were filled with the sound of wet, moving tires. For an hour Quinn sat on the bench, protecting himself with a black umbrella, thinking Stillman would appear at any moment. He worked his way through his roll and coffee, read the account of the Mets' Sunday loss, and still there was no sign of the old man. Patience, he said to himself, and began to tackle the rest of the paper. Forty minutes passed. He reached the financial section and was about to read an analysis of a corporate merger when the rain suddenly intensified. Reluctantly, he got up from his bench and removed himself to a doorway across the street from the hotel. He stood there in his clammy shoes for an hour and a half. Was Stillman sick? he wondered. Quinn tried to imagine him lying in his bed, sweating out a fever. Perhaps the old man had died during the night and his body had not yet been discovered. Such things happened, he told himself.



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City of Glass CD 03 parte II (1)

“I needed him, you see. Lo necesitaba, ya ves. I had certain ideas at the time that were too dangerous and controversial. Tenía ciertas ideas en ese momento que eran demasiado peligrosas y controvertidas. So I pretended they had come from someone else. Así que fingí que venían de otra persona. It was a way of protecting myself.” Era una forma de protegerme”.

“How did you decide on the name Henry Dark?” "¿Cómo decidiste el nombre de Henry Dark?"

“It's a good name, don't you think? Es un buen nombre, ¿no crees? I like it very much. Me gusta mucho. Full of mystery, and at the same time quite proper. Lleno de misterio, y al mismo tiempo muy correcto. It suited my purpose well. Se adaptaba bien a mi propósito. And besides, it had a secret meaning.” Y además, tenía un significado secreto.

“The allusion to darkness?” "¿La alusión a la oscuridad?"

“No, no. "No no. Nothing so obvious. Nada tan obvio. It was the initials, H.D. Eran las iniciales, HD That was very important.” Eso fue muy importante”.

“How so?” "¿Cómo es eso?"

“Don't you want to guess?” "¿No quieres adivinar?"

“I don't think so.” "No me parece."

“Oh, do try. “Oh, inténtalo. Make three guesses. Haz tres conjeturas. If you don't get it, then I'll tell you.” Si no lo entiendes, entonces te lo diré”.

Quinn paused for a moment, trying to give it his best effort. Quinn hizo una pausa por un momento, tratando de hacer su mejor esfuerzo. “H.D.,” he said. "HD", dijo. “For Henry David? ¿Para Henry David? As in Henry David Thoreau.” Como en Henry David Thoreau.

“Not even close.” "Ni siquiera cerca."

“How about H.D. “¿Qué tal HD pure and simple? ¿puro y simple? For the poet Hilda Doolittle.” Para la poeta Hilda Doolittle.

“Worse than the first one.” “Peor que el primero.”

“All right, one more guess. “Muy bien, una suposición más. H.D. alta definición H…. H…. and D…. y D…. Just a moment…. Sólo un momento…. How about…. Qué tal si…. Just a moment…. Sólo un momento…. Ah…. Ah…. Yes, here we are. Sí, aquí estamos. H for the weeping philosopher, Heraclitus…and D for the laughing philosopher, Democritus. H para el filósofo que llora, Heráclito… y D para el filósofo que ríe, Demócrito. Heraclitus and Democritus…the two poles of the dialectic.” Heráclito y Demócrito… los dos polos de la dialéctica.”

“A very clever answer.” "Una respuesta muy inteligente".

“Am I right?” "¿Tengo razón?"

“No, of course not. "No claro que no. But a clever answer just the same.” Pero una respuesta inteligente de todos modos.

“You can't say I didn't try.” "No puedes decir que no lo intenté".

“No, I can't. “No, no puedo. That's why I'm going to reward you with the correct answer. Por eso te voy a recompensar con la respuesta correcta. Because you tried. Porque lo intentaste. Are you ready?” ¿Estás listo?"

“Ready.” "Listo."

“The initials H.D. “Las siglas HD in the name Henry Dark refer to Humpty Dumpty.” en el nombre Henry Dark se refiere a Humpty Dumpty”.

“Who?” "¿Quién?"

“Humpty Dumpty. "Humpty Dumpty. You know who I mean. Ya sabes a quién me refiero. The egg.” El huevo."

“As in ‘Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall'?” "¿Como en 'Humpty Dumpty sentado en una pared'?"

“Exactly.” "Exactamente."

“I don't understand.” "No entiendo."

“Humpty Dumpty: the purest embodiment of the human condition. “Humpty Dumpty: la encarnación más pura de la condición humana. Listen carefully, sir. Escuche con atención, señor. What is an egg? ¿Qué es un huevo? It is that which has not yet been born. Es lo que aún no ha nacido. A paradox, is it not? Una paradoja, ¿no? For how can Humpty Dumpty be alive if he has not been born? ¿Cómo puede Humpty Dumpty estar vivo si no ha nacido? And yet, he is alive—make no mistake. Y, sin embargo, está vivo, no se equivoquen. We know that because he can speak. Lo sabemos porque puede hablar. More than that, he is a philosopher of language. Más que eso, es un filósofo del lenguaje. ‘When I use a word, Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less. 'Cuando uso una palabra, dijo Humpty Dumpty, en un tono más bien desdeñoso, significa exactamente lo que elijo que signifique, ni más ni menos. The question is, said Alice, whether you can make words mean so many different things. La pregunta es, dijo Alicia, si puedes hacer que las palabras signifiquen tantas cosas diferentes. The question is, said Humpty Dumpty, which is to be master—that's all.'” La cuestión es, dijo Humpty Dumpty, que ser el amo, eso es todo'”.

“Lewis Carroll.” "Lewis Carroll."

“Through the Looking Glass, chapter six.” “A través del espejo, capítulo seis”.

“Interesting.” "Interesante."

“It's more than interesting, sir. Es más que interesante, señor. It's crucial. es crucial Listen carefully, and perhaps you will learn something. Escucha atentamente, y tal vez aprendas algo. In his little speech to Alice, Humpty Dumpty sketches the future of human hopes and gives the clue to our salvation: to become masters of the words we speak, to make language answer our needs. En su pequeño discurso a Alicia, Humpty Dumpty esboza el futuro de las esperanzas humanas y da la clave de nuestra salvación: convertirnos en maestros de las palabras que decimos, hacer que el lenguaje responda a nuestras necesidades. Humpty Dumpty was a prophet, a man who spoke truths the world was not ready for.” Humpty Dumpty fue un profeta, un hombre que dijo verdades para las que el mundo no estaba preparado”.

“A man?” "¿Un hombre?"

“Excuse me. "Perdóneme. A slip of the tongue. Lapsus linguae. I mean an egg. Me refiero a un huevo. But the slip is instructive and helps to prove my point. Pero el desliz es instructivo y ayuda a probar mi punto. For all men are eggs, in a manner of speaking. Porque todos los hombres son huevos, por así decirlo. We exist, but we have not yet achieved the form that is our destiny. Existimos, pero aún no hemos alcanzado la forma que es nuestro destino. We are pure potential, an example of the not-yet-arrived. Somos puro potencial, un ejemplo de lo que aún no ha llegado. For man is a fallen creature—we know that from Genesis. Porque el hombre es una criatura caída—lo sabemos por Génesis. Humpty Dumpty is also a fallen creature. Humpty Dumpty es también una criatura caída. He falls from his wall, and no one can put him back together again—neither the king, nor his horses, nor his men. Cae de su muro, y nadie puede volver a armarlo, ni el rey, ni sus caballos, ni sus hombres. But that is what we must all now strive to do. Pero eso es lo que ahora todos debemos esforzarnos por hacer. It is our duty as human beings: to put the egg back together again. Es nuestro deber como seres humanos: volver a armar el huevo. For each of us, sir, is Humpty Dumpty. Para cada uno de nosotros, señor, es Humpty Dumpty. And to help him is to help ourselves.” Y ayudarlo es ayudarnos a nosotros mismos”.

“A convincing argument.” "Un argumento convincente".

“It's impossible to find a flaw in it.” “Es imposible encontrarle un defecto”.

“No cracks in the egg.” “Sin grietas en el huevo”.

“Exactly.” "Exactamente."

“And, at the same time, the origin of Henry Dark.” “Y, al mismo tiempo, el origen de Henry Dark”.

“Yes. "Sí. But there is more to it than that. Pero hay más que eso. Another egg, in fact.” Otro huevo, de hecho.

“There's more than one?” "¿Hay más de uno?"

“Good heavens, yes. “Cielos, sí. There are millions of them. Hay millones de ellos. But the one I have in mind is particularly famous. Pero el que tengo en mente es particularmente famoso. It's probably the most celebrated egg of all.” Es probablemente el huevo más célebre de todos”.

“You're beginning to lose me.” Estás empezando a perderme.

“I'm speaking of Columbus's egg.” “Estoy hablando del huevo de Colón”.

“Ah, yes. "Ah, sí. Of course.” Por supuesto."

“You know the story?” "¿Conoces la historia?"

“Everyone does.” "Todos lo hacen."

“It's charming, is it not? “Es encantador, ¿no? When faced with the problem of how to stand an egg on its end, he merely tapped slightly on the bottom, cracking the shell just enough to create a certain flatness that would support the egg when he removed his hand.” Cuando se enfrentó al problema de cómo poner un huevo de pie, simplemente golpeó ligeramente la parte inferior, rompiendo la cáscara lo suficiente como para crear una cierta planitud que soportaría el huevo cuando quitara la mano”.

“It worked.” "Funcionó."

“Of course it worked. “Por supuesto que funcionó. Columbus was a genius. Colón era un genio. He sought paradise and discovered the New World. Buscó el paraíso y descubrió el Nuevo Mundo. It is still not too late for it to become paradise.” Todavía no es demasiado tarde para que se convierta en un paraíso”.

“Indeed.” "Por cierto."

“I admit that things have not worked out too well yet. “Admito que las cosas no han funcionado demasiado bien todavía. But there is still hope. Pero aún hay esperanza. Americans have never lost their desire to discover new worlds. Los estadounidenses nunca han perdido su deseo de descubrir nuevos mundos. Do you remember what happened in 1969?” ¿Recuerdas lo que pasó en 1969?

“I remember many things. What do you have in mind?”

“Men walked on the moon. “Los hombres caminaron sobre la luna. Think of that, dear sir. Piense en eso, querido señor. Men walked on the moon!” ¡Los hombres caminaron sobre la luna!”

“Yes, I remember. "Sí, lo recuerdo. According to the President, it was the greatest event since creation.” Según el Presidente, fue el evento más grande desde la creación”.

“He was right. "Él estaba en lo correcto. The only intelligent thing that man ever said. La única cosa inteligente que ese hombre jamás dijo. And what do you suppose the moon looks like?” ¿Y cómo crees que es la luna?

“I have no idea.” "No tengo ni idea."

“Come, come, think again.” "Ven, ven, piénsalo de nuevo".

“Oh yes. "Oh sí. Now I see what you mean.” Ahora veo lo que quieres decir.

“Granted, the resemblance is not perfect. “Concedido, el parecido no es perfecto. But it is true that in certain phases, especially on a clear night, the moon does look very much like an egg.” Pero es cierto que en ciertas fases, especialmente en una noche clara, la luna sí se parece mucho a un huevo”.

“Yes. "Sí. Very much like.” Gusta mucho."

At that moment, a waitress appeared with Stillman's breakfast and set it on the table before him. En ese momento, apareció una camarera con el desayuno de Stillman y lo colocó en la mesa frente a él. The old man eyed the food with relish. El anciano miró la comida con deleite. Decorously lifting a knife with his right hand, he cracked the shell of his soft-boiled egg and said, “As you can see, sir, I leave no stone unturned.” Levantando decorosamente un cuchillo con la mano derecha, partió la cáscara de su huevo pasado por agua y dijo: "Como puede ver, señor, no dejo piedra sin remover".

The third meeting took place later that same day. La tercera reunión tuvo lugar más tarde ese mismo día. The afternoon was well advanced: the light like gauze on the bricks and leaves, the shadows lengthening. La tarde estaba bien avanzada: la luz como gasa sobre los ladrillos y las hojas, las sombras alargadas. Once again, Stillman retreated to Riverside Park, this time to the edge of it, coming to rest on a knobby outcrop at 84th Street known as Mount Tom. Una vez más, Stillman se retiró a Riverside Park, esta vez al borde del mismo, y se detuvo en un afloramiento nudoso en la calle 84 conocido como Mount Tom. On this same spot, in the summers of 1843 and 1844, Edgar Allan Poe had spent many long hours gazing out at the Hudson. En este mismo lugar, en los veranos de 1843 y 1844, Edgar Allan Poe había pasado largas horas contemplando el Hudson. Quinn knew this because he had made it his business to know such things. Quinn lo sabía porque se había propuesto saber esas cosas. As it turned out, he had often sat there himself. Al final resultó que, a menudo él mismo se había sentado allí.

He felt little fear now about doing what he had to do. Ahora sentía poco miedo de hacer lo que tenía que hacer. He circled the rock two or three times, but failed to get Stillman's attention. Dio dos o tres vueltas a la roca, pero no logró llamar la atención de Stillman. Then he sat down next to the old man and said hello. Luego se sentó al lado del anciano y lo saludó. Incredibly, Stillman did not recognize him. Increíblemente, Stillman no lo reconoció. This was the third time Quinn had presented himself, and each time it was as though Quinn had been someone else. Esta era la tercera vez que Quinn se presentaba, y cada vez era como si Quinn hubiera sido otra persona. He could not decide whether this was a good sign or bad. No podía decidir si esto era una buena o mala señal. If Stillman was pretending, he was an actor like no other in the world. Si Stillman estaba fingiendo, era un actor como ningún otro en el mundo. For each time Quinn had appeared, he had done it by surprise. Cada vez que Quinn había aparecido, lo había hecho por sorpresa. And yet Stillman had not even blinked. Y, sin embargo, Stillman ni siquiera parpadeó. On the other hand, if Stillman really did not recognize him, what did this mean? Por otro lado, si Stillman realmente no lo reconoció, ¿qué significaba esto? Was it possible for anyone to be so impervious to the things he saw? ¿Era posible que alguien fuera tan impermeable a las cosas que veía?

The old man asked him who he was. El anciano le preguntó quién era.

“My name is Peter Stillman,” said Quinn. “Mi nombre es Peter Stillman”, dijo Quinn.

“That's my name,” answered Stillman. “Ese es mi nombre”, respondió Stillman. “I'm Peter Stillman.” Soy Peter Stillman.

“I'm the other Peter Stillman,” said Quinn. “Soy el otro Peter Stillman”, dijo Quinn.

“Oh. "Vaya. You mean my son. Te refieres a mi hijo. Yes, that's possible. Sí, eso es posible. You look just like him. Te pareces a él. Of course, Peter is blond and you are dark. Por supuesto, Peter es rubio y tú eres moreno. Not Henry Dark, but dark of hair. No Henry Dark, sino moreno de pelo. But people change, don't they? Pero la gente cambia, ¿no? One minute we're one thing, and then another another.” Un minuto somos una cosa, y luego otro otra”.

“Exactly.” "Exactamente."

“I've often wondered about you, Peter. A menudo me he preguntado por ti, Peter. Many times I've thought to myself, ‘I wonder how Peter is getting along.'” Muchas veces he pensado para mis adentros: 'Me pregunto cómo le va a Peter'”.

“I'm much better now, thank you.” "Estoy mucho mejor ahora, gracias".

“I'm glad to hear it. "Me alegra oírlo. Someone once told me you had died. Alguien me dijo una vez que habías muerto. It made me very sad.” Me puso muy triste”.

“No, I've made a complete recovery.” "No, me he recuperado por completo".

“I can see that. "Puedo ver eso. Fit as a fiddle. En buen estado físico. And you speak so well, too.” Y hablas tan bien, también.

“All words are available to me now. “Todas las palabras están disponibles para mí ahora. Even the ones most people have trouble with. Incluso aquellos con los que la mayoría de la gente tiene problemas. I can say them all.” Puedo decirlos todos”.

“I'm proud of you, Peter.” "Estoy orgulloso de ti, Pedro".

“I owe it all to you.” "Te lo debo todo a ti."

“Children are a great blessing. “Los niños son una gran bendición. I've always said that. Siempre he dicho eso. An incomparable blessing.” Una bendición incomparable.”

“I'm sure of it.” "Estoy seguro de ello."

“As for me, I have my good days and my bad days. “En cuanto a mí, tengo mis días buenos y mis días malos. When the bad days come, I think of the ones that were good. Cuando vienen los días malos, pienso en los que fueron buenos. Memory is a great blessing, Peter. La memoria es una gran bendición, Peter. The next best thing to death.” Lo mejor después de la muerte.

“Without a doubt.” "Sin duda."

“Of course, we must live in the present, too. “Por supuesto, también debemos vivir en el presente. For example, I am currently in New York. Por ejemplo, actualmente estoy en Nueva York. Tomorrow, I could be somewhere else. Mañana, podría estar en otro lugar. I travel a great deal, you see. Yo viajo mucho, ya ves. Here today, gone tomorrow. Hoy aquí, mañana ya no. It's part of my work.” Es parte de mi trabajo”.

“It must be stimulating.” Debe ser estimulante.

“Yes, I'm very stimulated. “Sí, estoy muy estimulado. My mind never stops.” Mi mente nunca se detiene”.

“That's good to hear.” "Eso es bueno escuchar."

“The years weigh heavily, it's true. “Los años pesan mucho, es verdad. But we have so much to be thankful for. Pero tenemos mucho que agradecer. Time makes us grow old, but it also gives us the day and the night. El tiempo nos hace envejecer, pero también nos da el día y la noche. And when we die, there is always someone to take our place.” Y cuando morimos, siempre hay alguien que toma nuestro lugar”.

“We all grow old.” “Todos envejecemos”.

“When you're old, perhaps you'll have a son to comfort you.” “Cuando seas viejo, quizás tengas un hijo que te consuele”.

“I would like that.”

“Then you would be as fortunate as I have been. “Entonces serías tan afortunado como lo he sido yo. Remember, Peter, children are a great blessing.” Recuerda, Peter, los niños son una gran bendición”.

“I won't forget.”

“And remember, too, that you shouldn't put all your eggs in one basket. “Y recuerda, también, que no debes poner todos los huevos en la misma canasta. Conversely, don't count your chickens before they hatch.” Por el contrario, no cuentes tus pollos antes de que nazcan”.

“No. "No. I try to take things as they come.” Trato de tomar las cosas como vienen”.

“Last of all, never say a thing you know in your heart is not true.” “Por último, nunca digas algo que sabes en tu corazón que no es verdad”.

“I won't.” "No lo haré".

“Lying is a bad thing. “Mentir es algo malo. It makes you sorry you were ever born. Te hace arrepentirte de haber nacido. And not to have been born is a curse. Y no haber nacido es una maldición. You are condemned to live outside time. Estás condenado a vivir fuera del tiempo. And when you live outside time, there is no day and night. Y cuando vives fuera del tiempo, no hay día ni noche. You don't even get a chance to die.” Ni siquiera tienes la oportunidad de morir.

“I understand.” "Entiendo."

“A lie can never be undone. “Una mentira nunca se puede deshacer. Even the truth is not enough. Incluso la verdad no es suficiente. I am a father, and I know about these things. Soy padre, y sé de estas cosas. Remember what happened to the father of our country. Recuerda lo que le pasó al padre de nuestra patria. He chopped down the cherry tree, and then he said to his father, ‘I cannot tell a lie.' Soon thereafter, he threw the coin across the river. Cortó el cerezo y luego le dijo a su padre: 'No puedo decir una mentira'. Poco después, tiró la moneda al otro lado del río. These two stories are crucial events in American history. Estas dos historias son eventos cruciales en la historia estadounidense. George Washington chopped down the tree, and then he threw away the money. George Washington cortó el árbol y luego tiró el dinero. Do you understand? ¿Lo entiendes? He was telling us an essential truth. Nos estaba diciendo una verdad esencial. Namely, that money doesn't grow on trees. Es decir, que el dinero no crece en los árboles. This is what made our country great, Peter. Esto es lo que hizo grande a nuestro país, Peter. Now George Washington's picture is on every dollar bill. Ahora la foto de George Washington está en todos los billetes de dólar. There is an important lesson to be learned from all this.” Hay una lección importante que aprender de todo esto”.

“I agree with you.” "Estoy de acuerdo contigo."

“Of course, it's unfortunate that the tree was cut down. “Por supuesto, es desafortunado que el árbol haya sido cortado. That tree was the Tree of Life, and it would have made us immune to death. Ese árbol era el Árbol de la Vida, y nos habría hecho inmunes a la muerte. Now we welcome death with open arms, especially when we are old. Ahora recibimos la muerte con los brazos abiertos, especialmente cuando somos viejos. But the father of our country knew his duty. Pero el padre de nuestra patria sabía cuál era su deber. He could not do otherwise. No podía hacer otra cosa. That is the meaning of the phrase ‘Life is a bowl of cherries.' If the tree had remained standing, we would have had eternal life.” Ese es el significado de la frase 'La vida es un cuenco de cerezas'. Si el árbol hubiera permanecido en pie, habríamos tenido vida eterna”.

“Yes, I see what you mean.” "Sí, ya veo lo que quieres decir".

“I have many such ideas in my head. “Tengo muchas ideas así en mi cabeza. My mind never stops. Mi mente nunca se detiene. You were always a clever boy, Peter, and I'm glad you understand.” Siempre fuiste un chico inteligente, Peter, y me alegro de que lo entiendas.

“I can follow you perfectly.” "Puedo seguirte perfectamente".

“A father must always teach his son the lessons he has learned. “Un padre siempre debe enseñar a su hijo las lecciones que ha aprendido. In that way knowledge is passed down from generation to generation, and we grow wise.” De esa manera, el conocimiento se transmite de generación en generación y crecemos en sabiduría”.

“I won't forget what you've told me.” "No olvidaré lo que me has dicho".

“I'll be able to die happily now, Peter.” "Podré morir feliz ahora, Peter".

“I'm glad.” "Me alegro."

“But you musn't forget anything.” Pero no debes olvidar nada.

“I won't, father. “No lo haré, padre. I promise.” Prometo."

The next morning, Quinn was in front of the hotel at his usual time. A la mañana siguiente, Quinn estaba frente al hotel a su hora habitual. The weather had finally changed. El clima finalmente había cambiado. After two weeks of resplendent skies, a drizzle now fell on New York, and the streets were filled with the sound of wet, moving tires. Después de dos semanas de cielos resplandecientes, ahora caía una llovizna sobre Nueva York, y las calles se llenaban con el sonido de llantas mojadas y en movimiento. For an hour Quinn sat on the bench, protecting himself with a black umbrella, thinking Stillman would appear at any moment. Durante una hora, Quinn se sentó en el banco, protegiéndose con un paraguas negro, pensando que Stillman aparecería en cualquier momento. He worked his way through his roll and coffee, read the account of the Mets' Sunday loss, and still there was no sign of the old man. Trabajó su panecillo y su café, leyó el informe de la derrota del domingo de los Mets y aún no había ni rastro del anciano. Patience, he said to himself, and began to tackle the rest of the paper. Paciencia, se dijo, y empezó a abordar el resto del papel. Forty minutes passed. Pasaron cuarenta minutos. He reached the financial section and was about to read an analysis of a corporate merger when the rain suddenly intensified. Llegó a la sección financiera y estaba a punto de leer un análisis de una fusión empresarial cuando la lluvia se intensificó de repente. Reluctantly, he got up from his bench and removed himself to a doorway across the street from the hotel. A regañadientes, se levantó de su banco y se dirigió a una puerta al otro lado de la calle del hotel. He stood there in his clammy shoes for an hour and a half. Se quedó allí con sus zapatos húmedos durante una hora y media. Was Stillman sick? ¿Stillman estaba enfermo? he wondered. el se preguntó. Quinn tried to imagine him lying in his bed, sweating out a fever. Quinn trató de imaginárselo acostado en su cama, sudando por la fiebre. Perhaps the old man had died during the night and his body had not yet been discovered. Quizás el anciano había muerto durante la noche y su cuerpo aún no había sido descubierto. Such things happened, he told himself. Tales cosas sucedían, se dijo a sí mismo.

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