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City Of Glass - New York Trilogy #1, City of Glass - 04 (2)

City of Glass - 04 (2)

“What kind of letter was it?”

“An insane letter. He called Peter a devil boy and said there would be a day of reckoning.”

“Do you still have the letter?”

“No. I gave it to the police two years ago.”

“A copy?”

“I'm sorry. Do you think it's important?”

“It might be.”

“I can try to get one for you if you like.”

“I take it there were no more letters after that one.”

“No more letters. And now they feel Stillman is ready to be discharged. That's the official view, in any case, and there's nothing I can do to stop them. What I think, though, is that Stillman simply learned his lesson. He realized that letters and threats would keep him locked up.”

“And so you're still worried.”

“That's right.”

“But you have no precise idea of what Stillman's plans might be.”

“Exactly.”

“What is it you want me to do?”

“I want you to watch him carefully. I want you to find out what he's up to. I want you to keep him away from Peter.”

“In other words, a kind of glorified tail job.”

“I suppose so.”

“I think you should understand that I can't prevent Stillman from coming to this building. What I can do is warn you about it. And I can make it my business to come here with him.”

“I understand. As long as there's some protection.”

“Good. How often do you want me to check in with you?”

“I'd like you to give me a report every day. Say a telephone call in the evening, around ten or eleven o'clock.”

“No problem.”

“Is there anything else?”

“Just a few more questions. I'm curious, for example, to know how you found out that Stillman will be coming into Grand Central tomorrow evening.”

“I've made it my business to know, Mr. Auster. There's too much at stake here for me to leave it to chance. And if Stillman isn't followed from the moment he arrives, he could easily disappear without a trace. I don't want that to happen.”

“Which train will he be on?”

“The six-forty-one, arriving from Poughkeepsie.”

“I assume you have a photograph of Stillman?”

“Yes, of course.”

“There's also the question of Peter. I'd like to know why you told him about all this in the first place. Wouldn't it have been better to have kept it quiet?”

“I wanted to. But Peter happened to be listening in on the other phone when I got the news of his father's release. There was nothing I could do about it. Peter can be very stubborn, and I've learned it's best not to lie to him.”

“One last question. Who was it who referred you to me?”

“Mrs. Saavedra's husband, Michael. He used to be a policeman, and he did some research. He found out that you were the best man in the city for this kind of thing.”

“I'm flattered.”

“From what I've seen of you so far, Mr. Auster, I'm sure we've found the right man.”

Quinn took this as his cue to rise. It came as a relief to stretch his legs at last. Things had gone well, far better than he had expected, but his head hurt now, and his body ached with an exhaustion he had not felt in years. If he carried on any longer, he was sure to give himself away.

“My fee is one hundred dollars a day plus expenses,” he said. “If you could give me something in advance, it would be proof that I'm working for you—which would ensure us a privileged investigator-client relationship. That means everything that passes between us would be in strictest confidence.”

Virginia Stillman smiled, as if at some secret joke of her own. Or perhaps she was merely responding to the possible double meaning of his last sentence. Like so many of the things that happened to him over the days and weeks that followed, Quinn could not be sure of any of it.

“How much would you like?” she asked.

“It doesn't matter. I'll leave that up to you.”

“Five hundred?”

“That would be more than enough.”

“Good. I'll go get my checkbook.” Virginia Stillman stood up and smiled at Quinn again. “I'll get you a picture of Peter's father, too. I think I know just where it is.”



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City of Glass - 04 (2) City of Glass - 04 (2)

“What kind of letter was it?”

“An insane letter. He called Peter a devil boy and said there would be a day of reckoning.”

“Do you still have the letter?”

“No. I gave it to the police two years ago.”

“A copy?”

“I'm sorry. Do you think it's important?”

“It might be.”

“I can try to get one for you if you like.”

“I take it there were no more letters after that one.”

“No more letters. And now they feel Stillman is ready to be discharged. That's the official view, in any case, and there's nothing I can do to stop them. What I think, though, is that Stillman simply learned his lesson. He realized that letters and threats would keep him locked up.”

“And so you're still worried.”

“That's right.”

“But you have no precise idea of what Stillman's plans might be.”

“Exactly.”

“What is it you want me to do?”

“I want you to watch him carefully. I want you to find out what he's up to. I want you to keep him away from Peter.”

“In other words, a kind of glorified tail job.” "En otras palabras, una especie de trabajo de cola glorificado".

“I suppose so.” "Supongo que sí."

“I think you should understand that I can't prevent Stillman from coming to this building. Creo que debería entender que no puedo evitar que Stillman venga a este edificio. What I can do is warn you about it. Lo que puedo hacer es advertirte al respecto. And I can make it my business to come here with him.” Y puedo ocuparme de venir aquí con él.

“I understand. "Entiendo. As long as there's some protection.” Siempre y cuando haya alguna protección.

“Good. How often do you want me to check in with you?” ¿Con qué frecuencia quieres que me comunique contigo?

“I'd like you to give me a report every day. “Me gustaría que me diera un informe todos los días. Say a telephone call in the evening, around ten or eleven o'clock.” Digamos una llamada telefónica por la noche, alrededor de las diez o las once.

“No problem.” "No hay problema."

“Is there anything else?” "¿Hay algo mas?"

“Just a few more questions. "Solo unas pocas preguntas más. I'm curious, for example, to know how you found out that Stillman will be coming into Grand Central tomorrow evening.” Tengo curiosidad, por ejemplo, por saber cómo se enteró de que Stillman vendrá a Grand Central mañana por la tarde.

“I've made it my business to know, Mr. Auster. Me he propuesto saberlo, señor Auster. There's too much at stake here for me to leave it to chance. Hay demasiado en juego aquí como para dejarlo al azar. And if Stillman isn't followed from the moment he arrives, he could easily disappear without a trace. Y si no se sigue a Stillman desde el momento en que llega, podría desaparecer fácilmente sin dejar rastro. I don't want that to happen.” No quiero que eso suceda”.

“Which train will he be on?” "¿En qué tren estará?"

“The six-forty-one, arriving from Poughkeepsie.” El de las seis cuarenta y uno, procedente de Poughkeepsie.

“I assume you have a photograph of Stillman?” ¿Supongo que tienes una fotografía de Stillman?

“Yes, of course.”

“There's also the question of Peter. “También está la cuestión de Peter. I'd like to know why you told him about all this in the first place. Me gustaría saber por qué le contaste todo esto en primer lugar. Wouldn't it have been better to have kept it quiet?” ¿No hubiera sido mejor haberlo mantenido en silencio?

“I wanted to. "Quería. But Peter happened to be listening in on the other phone when I got the news of his father's release. Pero resultó que Peter estaba escuchando en el otro teléfono cuando recibí la noticia de la liberación de su padre. There was nothing I could do about it. No había nada que pudiera hacer al respecto. Peter can be very stubborn, and I've learned it's best not to lie to him.” Peter puede ser muy terco y he aprendido que es mejor no mentirle”.

“One last question. "Una última pregunta. Who was it who referred you to me?” ¿Quién fue el que te refirió a mí?

“Mrs. "Sra. Saavedra's husband, Michael. El esposo de Saavedra, Miguel. He used to be a policeman, and he did some research. Solía ser policía e investigó un poco. He found out that you were the best man in the city for this kind of thing.” Descubrió que eras el mejor hombre de la ciudad para este tipo de cosas.

“I'm flattered.” "Me halaga."

“From what I've seen of you so far, Mr. Auster, I'm sure we've found the right man.” Por lo que he visto de usted hasta ahora, señor Auster, estoy seguro de que hemos encontrado al hombre adecuado.

Quinn took this as his cue to rise. Quinn tomó esto como una señal para levantarse. It came as a relief to stretch his legs at last. Fue un alivio estirar las piernas por fin. Things had gone well, far better than he had expected, but his head hurt now, and his body ached with an exhaustion he had not felt in years. Las cosas habían ido bien, mucho mejor de lo que esperaba, pero ahora le dolía la cabeza y le dolía el cuerpo con un agotamiento que no había sentido en años. If he carried on any longer, he was sure to give himself away. Si continuaba más, estaba seguro de que se delataría.

“My fee is one hundred dollars a day plus expenses,” he said. “Mi tarifa es de cien dólares diarios más gastos”, dijo. “If you could give me something in advance, it would be proof that I'm working for you—which would ensure us a privileged investigator-client relationship. “Si pudiera darme algo por adelantado, sería una prueba de que estoy trabajando para usted, lo que nos aseguraría una relación privilegiada entre investigador y cliente. That means everything that passes between us would be in strictest confidence.” Eso significa que todo lo que pase entre nosotros será estrictamente confidencial.

Virginia Stillman smiled, as if at some secret joke of her own. Virginia Stillman sonrió, como si fuera una broma secreta suya. Or perhaps she was merely responding to the possible double meaning of his last sentence. O tal vez simplemente estaba respondiendo al posible doble significado de su última oración. Like so many of the things that happened to him over the days and weeks that followed, Quinn could not be sure of any of it. Como muchas de las cosas que le sucedieron en los días y semanas que siguieron, Quinn no podía estar seguro de nada de eso.

“How much would you like?” she asked. "¿Cuanto te gustaría?" ella preguntó.

“It doesn't matter. "No importa. I'll leave that up to you.” Te lo dejo a ti.

“Five hundred?” "¿Quinientos?"

“That would be more than enough.”

“Good. I'll go get my checkbook.” Virginia Stillman stood up and smiled at Quinn again. Iré a buscar mi chequera. Virginia Stillman se levantó y volvió a sonreír a Quinn. “I'll get you a picture of Peter's father, too. También te daré una foto del padre de Peter. I think I know just where it is.”

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