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English E-reader (Graded readers), The Truly Married Woman (2)

The Truly Married Woman (2)

'Do you mean you are going to wear these?' she asked.

'Yes,' Ayo replied simply.

'But, my sister,' she protested, 'suppose you had an accident and all those doctors lifted your clothes in hospital. They will see everything through these.'

'I never have accidents,' Ayo answered, and added, 'Ajayi says all the Hollywood cinema women wear these.'

'These are awful; they hide nothing, you should be ashamed to wear them,' the jealous girl said, pushing them angrily back over the wall to Ayo.

'Why should I want to hide anything from my husband when we are married?' Ayo said, winning the argument and moving happily back to her own kitchen.

The arrangements had to be made quickly, since time and the tightness of the corset were both against them. Ajayi missed his normal life, particularly his morning cup of tea. He borrowed a lot of money to pay for the music, the food, and the dresses that Ayo and her sisters would wear on the wedding day.

The day before the wedding, Ajayi's uncle and other relations took a Bible and a ring to Ayo's father. They took with them two small girls carrying on their heads large gourds, which contained things like pins, small coins, fruit, and nuts. These were traditional gifts to the bride from the bridegroom, so that in future arguments Ayo could not say, 'This terrible man has given me neither a pin nor a coin since we got married.'

On arrival at Ayo's father's house, the small group passed it first, pretending to be uncertain, then returned to it. Ajayi's uncle then knocked several times. Voices from inside asked for his name, the name of his family, and his reason for coming. He told them. Half an hour of discussion and argument followed. Was Ajayi's family good enough? Ajayi himself was waiting at home, but his relations enjoyed the argument and pretended to be frightened. At last Ayo's father opened the door. It should now be clear to Ajayi's relations that this was a family that was proud, difficult, and above the ordinary.

'Why have you come here?' asked Ayo's father.

Ajayi's uncle answered:

'We have come to pick a red, red rose

That in your beautiful garden grows,

Which never has been picked before,

So lovelier than any other.'

'Will you be able to take good care of our lovely rose?' asked another relation.

Ajayi's family replied:

'Such good care shall we take of your rose That many others will grow from it.'

They were finally allowed into the house; drinks were served, the gifts were accepted, and others given. For thirty minutes they talked about everything except the wedding. All through this, Ayo and her sisters and some other young women were kept hidden in a bedroom. Finally Ayo's father asked what brought Ajayi's family to his house.

'We have heard of a beautiful, obedient woman known as Ayo,' said Ajayi's uncle. 'We ask for her as a wife for Ajayi.'

Ayo's father opened the bedroom door and brought out Ayo's sister.

'Is this the one?' he asked.

Ajayi's relations looked at her carefully.

'No, this one is too short to be Ayo.'

Then a cousin was brought out.

'Is this the right woman?'

'No, this one is too fat.'

About ten women were brought out, but none was the right one.

'It was a good thing we asked to see her,' said Ajayi's uncle, turning to his relations, 'or we could get the wrong woman.' The relations agreed.

'All right,' said Ayo's father. 'Don't be impatient; I wanted to be sure that you knew who you wanted.' With tears in his eyes he called Ayo out from the bedroom, kissed her, and showed her to Ajayi's family.

'Is this the girl you want?' he asked.

'This is the very one,' Ajayi's uncle replied with joy.

'Hip, hip, hooray,' everyone shouted, dancing in a circle round Ayo as the music started. And as she stood in the center, a woman in her mid-thirties with slightly grey hair, in a ceremony that she had often seen but had stopped dreaming of for herself, Ayo cried with joy, and her unborn child moved inside her for the first time.

The next morning the women of her family helped her to wash and dress. Her father gave her. away at the marriage ceremony in church, a quiet wedding with about sixty people present. Afterwards they went to Ayo's family home for the wedding meal. At the door one of Ayo's old aunts met them and gave them a glass of water to drink from - first Ajayi, then Ayo.

'Do not be too friendly with other women,' she told Ayo, 'because they will steal your husband. Live peaceably together, and do not let the sun go down on an argument between you. And you, Ajayi, remember that a wife can be just as exciting as a mistress! And do not use violence against our daughter, who is now your wife.'

By now everyone had arrived, and they went into the house for the European part of the ceremony. The wedding cake (which Ayo had made) was cut, and then Ajayi left for his own family home. Later he returned for Ayo. The women cried as they said goodbye to her.

'When it comes to the true work of a woman - having children - nobody can say that you are not enthusiastic,' said Ayo's mother through her tears.

Ajayi and Ayo visited various relations on both sides of the family and at last they were home. Ayo seemed different in Ajayi's eyes. He had never really looked at her carefully before. Now he saw her proud head, her long neck, her handsome shoulders, and he held her to him lovingly.

The next morning, as his alarm clock went off, he reached for his morning cup of tea. It was not there. He sat up quickly and looked. Nothing. He listened for Ayo's footsteps outside in the kitchen. Nothing. He turned to look beside him. Ayo was there. She must be ill, he thought, all that excitement yesterday.

'Ayo, Ayo,' he cried, 'are you ill?'

She turned round slowly, still lying down, and looked at him. She moved her feet under the cotton bedcover, getting comfortable. There was a terrible calm about her.

'No, Ajayi,' she replied, 'are you? Is something wrong with your legs?'

'No,' he said. He was alarmed, thinking that all the excitement had made her go a little crazy.

'Ajayi, my husband,' she said, 'for twelve years I have got up every morning at five to make tea for you and breakfast. Now I am a truly married woman, you must behave towards me with a little more respect. You are now a husband and not a lover. Get up and make yourself a cup of tea.'

- THE END -


The Truly Married Woman (2)

'Do you mean you are going to wear these?' she asked.

'Yes,' Ayo replied simply.

'But, my sister,' she protested, 'suppose you had an accident and all those doctors lifted your clothes in hospital. 「しかし、私の妹」と彼女は抗議しました。「あなたが事故に遭い、それらの医師全員が病院であなたの服を持ち上げたとしましょう。 They will see everything through these.'

'I never have accidents,' Ayo answered, and added, 'Ajayi says all the Hollywood cinema women wear these.' 'I never have accidents,' Ayo answered, and added, 'Ajayi says all the Hollywood cinema women wear these.' “我从来没有发生过事故,”Ayo 回答,并补充道,“Ajayi 说好莱坞电影中的所有女性都穿着这些。”

'These are awful; they hide nothing, you should be ashamed to wear them,' the jealous girl said, pushing them angrily back over the wall to Ayo. 'これらはひどいです。彼らは何も隠していません、あなたはそれらを身に着けることを恥じるべきです」と嫉妬深い少女は言った、彼らを怒って壁を越えてアヨに押し戻した。 '这些太可怕了;他们什么都没有隐藏,你应该为穿上它们感到羞耻,”嫉妒的女孩说,愤怒地把它们推回墙对阿约。

'Why should I want to hide anything from my husband when we are married?' 「私たちが結婚しているときに、なぜ私は夫から何かを隠したいのですか?」 Ayo said, winning the argument and moving happily back to her own kitchen. アヨは、議論に勝ち、幸せに自分のキッチンに戻って言った。

The arrangements had to be made quickly, since time and the tightness of the corset were both against them. 時間とコルセットの締まり具合が両方とも反対だったので、手配は迅速に行われなければなりませんでした。 Ajayi missed his normal life, particularly his morning cup of tea. アジャイは彼の通常の生活、特に彼の朝のお茶を逃した。 He borrowed a lot of money to pay for the music, the food, and the dresses that Ayo and her sisters would wear on the wedding day. 彼は、アヨと彼女の姉妹が結婚式の日に着る音楽、食べ物、そしてドレスの代金を払うためにたくさんのお金を借りました。

The day before the wedding, Ajayi's uncle and other relations took a Bible and a ring to Ayo's father. 結婚式の前日、アジャイの叔父と他の関係者は、アヨの父に聖書と指輪を持っていきました。 婚礼前一天,Ajayi 的叔叔和其他亲戚拿了一本圣经和一枚戒指给 Ayo 的父亲。 They took with them two small girls carrying on their heads large gourds, which contained things like pins, small coins, fruit, and nuts. 彼らは、ピン、小さなコイン、果物、ナッツなどが入った大きなひょうたんを頭に抱えた2人の小さな女の子を連れて行きました。 他们带着两个小女孩,头上顶着大葫芦,里面装着别针、小硬币、水果和坚果之类的东西。 These were traditional gifts to the bride from the bridegroom, so that in future arguments Ayo could not say, 'This terrible man has given me neither a pin nor a coin since we got married.' これらは花婿から花嫁への伝統的な贈り物だったので、将来の議論では、アヨは「私たちが結婚して以来、このひどい男は私にピンもコインもくれませんでした」と言うことができませんでした。 这些是新郎送给新娘的传统礼物,所以在以后的争吵中,阿约不能说:“自从我们结婚以来,这个可怕的男人既没有给我一枚别针,也没有给过我一枚硬币。”

On arrival at Ayo's father's house, the small group passed it first, pretending to be uncertain, then returned to it. アヨの父の家に到着すると、小グループは最初にそれを通り過ぎ、不確かなふりをして、そしてそこに戻った。 到了阿约爸爸的家里,一行人先是经过了,故作不确定,然后又回到了那里。 Ajayi's uncle then knocked several times. その後、アジャイの叔父は数回ノックした。 Voices from inside asked for his name, the name of his family, and his reason for coming. 中からの声が彼の名前、彼の家族の名前、そして彼が来る理由を尋ねました。 He told them. 彼は彼らに言った。 Half an hour of discussion and argument followed. 30分の議論と議論が続いた。 Was Ajayi's family good enough? アジャイの家族は十分でしたか? Ajayi himself was waiting at home, but his relations enjoyed the argument and pretended to be frightened. アジャイ自身は家で待っていたが、彼の関係は議論を楽しんで、おびえたふりをした。 At last Ayo's father opened the door. とうとうアヨのお父さんがドアを開けました。 It should now be clear to Ajayi's relations that this was a family that was proud, difficult, and above the ordinary. これで、アジャイの関係から、これが誇り高く、困難で、普通を超えた家族であったことが明らかになるはずです。

'Why have you come here?' 「なんでここに来たの?」 asked Ayo's father. アヨの父は尋ねた。

Ajayi's uncle answered: アジャイの叔父は答えた:

'We have come to pick a red, red rose 「私たちは赤、赤のバラを選ぶようになりました

That in your beautiful garden grows, あなたの美しい庭でそれは成長します、

Which never has been picked before, これまでに選ばれたことのないもの、

So lovelier than any other.' 他の誰よりもとても素敵です。」

'Will you be able to take good care of our lovely rose?' 「私たちの素敵なバラの世話をしてくれませんか?」 asked another relation. 別の関係を尋ねた。

Ajayi's family replied: アジャイの家族は答えた:

'Such good care shall we take of your rose That many others will grow from it.' 「他の多くの人がそれから成長するように、私たちはあなたのバラを大切にします。」

They were finally allowed into the house; drinks were served, the gifts were accepted, and others given. 彼らはついに家に入ることが許された。飲み物が出され、贈り物が受け取られ、他の人が与えられました。 For thirty minutes they talked about everything except the wedding. 30分間、彼らは結婚式以外のすべてについて話しました。 All through this, Ayo and her sisters and some other young women were kept hidden in a bedroom. この間ずっと、アヨと彼女の姉妹と他の何人かの若い女性は寝室に隠されていました。 Finally Ayo's father asked what brought Ajayi's family to his house. 最後に、アヨの父親は、アジャイの家族を彼の家に連れて行った理由を尋ねました。

'We have heard of a beautiful, obedient woman known as Ayo,' said Ajayi's uncle. 「アヨと呼ばれる美しく従順な女性のことを聞いたことがあります」とアジャイの叔父は言いました。 “我们听说过一个美丽、听话的女人,名叫 Ayo,”Ajayi 的叔叔说。 'We ask for her as a wife for Ajayi.'

Ayo's father opened the bedroom door and brought out Ayo's sister. アヨの父は寝室のドアを開け、アヨの妹を連れ出しました。

'Is this the one?' 「これは1つですか?」 he asked. 彼は尋ねた。

Ajayi's relations looked at her carefully. アジャイの関係は彼女を注意深く見た。

'No, this one is too short to be Ayo.' 「いいえ、これはアヨには短すぎます。」

Then a cousin was brought out. それからいとこが連れ出されました。

'Is this the right woman?' 「これは正しい女性ですか?」

'No, this one is too fat.' 「いいえ、これは太りすぎです。」

About ten women were brought out, but none was the right one. 約10人の女性が連れ出されましたが、正しい女性は誰もいませんでした。

'It was a good thing we asked to see her,' said Ajayi's uncle, turning to his relations, 'or we could get the wrong woman.' 「私たちが彼女に会うように頼んだのは良いことでした」とアジャイの叔父は彼の関係に目を向けて言いました。 “我们要求见她是件好事,”阿贾伊的叔叔转向他的亲戚说,“否则我们会找错女人。” The relations agreed.

'All right,' said Ayo's father. 'Don't be impatient; I wanted to be sure that you knew who you wanted.' 「焦ってはいけません。私はあなたがあなたが望む人を知っていることを確認したかったのです。」 With tears in his eyes he called Ayo out from the bedroom, kissed her, and showed her to Ajayi's family. 彼は涙を浮かべて寝室からアヨを呼び、キスをし、アジャイの家族に見せた。

'Is this the girl you want?' 「これはあなたが欲しい女の子ですか?」 he asked. 彼は尋ねた。

'This is the very one,' Ajayi's uncle replied with joy. 「これはまさにそれだ」とアジャイの叔父は喜びで答えた。

'Hip, hip, hooray,' everyone shouted, dancing in a circle round Ayo as the music started. 「ヒップ、ヒップ、フーレイ」とみんなが叫び、音楽が始まるとアヨの周りを輪になって踊りました。 “嘻嘻,嘻嘻,万岁,”随着音乐响起,每个人都高喊着,围着阿约跳舞。 And as she stood in the center, a woman in her mid-thirties with slightly grey hair, in a ceremony that she had often seen but had stopped dreaming of for herself, Ayo cried with joy, and her unborn child moved inside her for the first time. そして、30代半ばのやや白髪の女性が真ん中に立っていると、よく見かけるが夢を見なくなった式典で、アヨは喜んで泣き、胎児が彼女の中に引っ越してきました。初めて。 当她站在中间时,一位 30 多岁、头发略显灰白的女人,在她经常看到但不再为自己梦想的仪式中,Ayo 高兴地哭了起来,她未出生的孩子在她体内移动第一次。

The next morning the women of her family helped her to wash and dress. 翌朝、彼女の家族の女性たちは彼女が洗濯と着替えをするのを手伝いました。 Her father gave her. 彼女の父は彼女に与えた。 away at the marriage ceremony in church, a quiet wedding with about sixty people present. 教会での結婚式で、約60人が出席する静かな結婚式。 Afterwards they went to Ayo's family home for the wedding meal. その後、彼らは結婚式の食事のためにアヨの実家に行きました。 At the door one of Ayo's old aunts met them and gave them a glass of water to drink from - first Ajayi, then Ayo. ドアで、アヨの年老いた叔母の一人が彼らに会い、彼らに一杯の水を飲ませました。最初はアジャイ、次にアヨです。

'Do not be too friendly with other women,' she told Ayo, 'because they will steal your husband. 「他の女性とあまり友好的ではありません」と彼女はアヨに言いました。「彼らはあなたの夫を盗むからです。 Live peaceably together, and do not let the sun go down on an argument between you. 一緒に平和に暮らし、あなたの間の議論に太陽が沈まないようにしてください。 和平相处,不要因为你们之间的争吵而让太阳落山。 And you, Ajayi, remember that a wife can be just as exciting as a mistress! And do not use violence against our daughter, who is now your wife.'

By now everyone had arrived, and they went into the house for the European part of the ceremony. 至此,所有人都到齐了,他们进屋参加仪式的欧洲部分。 The wedding cake (which Ayo had made) was cut, and then Ajayi left for his own family home. アヨが作ったウエディングケーキを切って、アジャイは自分の実家に向かった。 婚礼蛋糕(由 Ayo 制作)被切好,然后 Ajayi 离开回自己的家。 Later he returned for Ayo. その後、彼はアヨに戻った。 The women cried as they said goodbye to her. 彼女に別れを告げると、女性たちは泣いた。

'When it comes to the true work of a woman - having children - nobody can say that you are not enthusiastic,' said Ayo's mother through her tears. 「子供を持つ女性の本当の仕事に関しては、誰もあなたが熱狂的ではないとは言えません」とアヨの母親は涙を流しながら言った。 “说到女人真正的工作——生孩子——没有人能说你不热情,”阿约的母亲含着泪说。

Ajayi and Ayo visited various relations on both sides of the family and at last they were home. アジャイとアヨは家族の両側のさまざまな関係を訪問し、ついに彼らは家に帰りました。 Ayo seemed different in Ajayi's eyes. アヨはアジャイの目には違って見えた。 He had never really looked at her carefully before. 彼はこれまで彼女を注意深く見たことがなかった。 Now he saw her proud head, her long neck, her handsome shoulders, and he held her to him lovingly. 今、彼は彼女の誇り高い頭、長い首、ハンサムな肩を見て、愛情を込めて彼女を抱きしめました。

The next morning, as his alarm clock went off, he reached for his morning cup of tea. 翌朝、目覚まし時計が鳴ったとき、彼は朝のお茶を飲みに行きました。 第二天早上,闹钟一响,他就伸手去拿早茶。 It was not there. そこにはありませんでした。 He sat up quickly and looked. 彼はすぐに起き上がって見ました。 Nothing. 何もない。 He listened for Ayo's footsteps outside in the kitchen. 彼は台所の外でアヨの足音を聞いた。 Nothing. 何もない。 He turned to look beside him. 彼は横を向いた。 Ayo was there. アヨはそこにいました。 She must be ill, he thought, all that excitement yesterday. 彼女は病気に違いない、と彼は思った、昨日のそのすべての興奮。 她一定是病了,他想,昨天还那么兴奋。

'Ayo, Ayo,' he cried, 'are you ill?' 「アヨ、アヨ」彼は叫んだ、「あなたは病気ですか?」

She turned round slowly, still lying down, and looked at him. 彼女はゆっくりと振り返り、まだ横になって彼を見ました。 She moved her feet under the cotton bedcover, getting comfortable. 彼女は綿のベッドカバーの下に足を動かし、快適になりました。 她把脚移到棉床罩下,感觉很舒服。 There was a terrible calm about her. 彼女にはひどい落ち着きがあった。

'No, Ajayi,' she replied, 'are you? Is something wrong with your legs?' 足に何か問題がありますか?」

'No,' he said. 「いいえ」と彼は言った。 He was alarmed, thinking that all the excitement had made her go a little crazy. 彼はすべての興奮が彼女を少し狂わせたと思って驚いた。 他惊慌失措,以为所有的兴奋都让她有点发疯了。

'Ajayi, my husband,' she said, 'for twelve years I have got up every morning at five to make tea for you and breakfast. 「私の夫、アジャイ」と彼女は言いました。「12年間、私は毎朝5時に起きて、あなたと朝食のためにお茶を作りました。 Now I am a truly married woman, you must behave towards me with a little more respect. 今、私は本当に既婚女性です。あなたはもう少し敬意を持って私に向かって行動しなければなりません。 You are now a husband and not a lover. あなたは今や夫であり、恋人ではありません。 Get up and make yourself a cup of tea.' 起きてお茶を一杯作ってください。」

- THE END -