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The Iliad of Homer, done into English prose, The Iliad of Homer, done into English prose (1)

The Iliad of Homer, done into English prose (1)

The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Iliad, by Homer

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere in the United States and

most other parts of the world at no cost and with almost no restrictions

whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms

of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at

www.gutenberg.org. If you are not located in the United States, you

will have to check the laws of the country where you are located before

using this eBook.

Title: The Iliad

Author: Homer

Translators: Andrew Lang, Walter Leaf and Ernest Meyers

Release Date: February, 2002 [eBook #3059]

[Most recently updated: January 20, 2022]

Language: English

Character set encoding: UTF-8

Produced by: Sandra Stewart and Jim Tinsley

* START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE ILIAD *

THE

ILIAD OF HOMER

Done into English Prose

by

Andrew Lang, M.A. Walter Leaf, Litt. D.

Late fellow of Merton College, Late fellow of Trinity College,

Oxford Cambridge

and

Ernest Meyers, M.A.

Late fellow of Wadham College,

Oxford

_REVISED EDITION_

MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED

ST. MARTINS STREET, LONDON

1911

Contents

PREFATORY NOTE.

THE ILIAD OF HOMER

BOOK I.

BOOK II.

BOOK III.

BOOK IV.

BOOK V.

BOOK VI.

BOOK VII.

BOOK VIII.

BOOK IX.

BOOK X.

BOOK XI.

BOOK XII.

BOOK XIII.

BOOK XIV.

BOOK XV.

BOOK XVI.

BOOK XVII.

BOOK XVIII.

BOOK XIX.

BOOK XX.

BOOK XXI.

BOOK XXII.

BOOK XXIII.

BOOK XXIV.

PREFATORY NOTE.

The execution of this version of the _Iliad_ has been entrusted to the

three Translators in the following three parts:

Books I. — IX. . . . . W. Leaf.

Books X. — XVI. . . . . A. Lang.

Books XVII. — XXIV. . . . . E. Myers.

Each Translator is therefore responsible for his own portion; but the

whole has been revised by all three Translators, and the rendering of

passages or phrases recurring in more than one portion has been

determined after deliberation in common. Even in these, however, a

certain elasticity has been deemed desirable.

On a few doubtful points, though very rarely, the opinion of two of the

translators has had to be adopted to the suppression of that held by

the third. Thus, for instance, the Translator of Books X. - XVI. Would

have preferred “c” and “us” to “k” and “os” in the spelling of all

proper names.

The text followed has been that of La Roche (Leipzig, 1873), except

where the adoption of a different reading has been specified in a

footnote. Where the balance of evidence, external and internal, has

seemed to the Translator to be against the genuineness of the passage,

such passage has been enclosed in brackets [].

The Translator of Books X. - XVI. has to thank Mr. R.W. Raper, Fellow

of Trinity College, Oxford, for his valuable aid in revising the

proof-sheets of these Books.

NOTE TO REVISED EDITION

In the present Edition the translation has been carefully revised

throughout, and numerous minor corrections have been made. The Notes at

the end of the volume have been, with a few exceptions, omitted; one of

the Translators hopes to publish very shortly a Companion to the Iliad

for English readers, which will deal fully with most of the points

therein referred to.

The use of square brackets has in this edition been restricted to

passages where there is external evidence, such as absence from the

best MSS., for believing in interpolation. One or two departures from

this Rule are noticed in footnotes.

_November_ 1891

The sacred soil of Ilios is rent

With shaft and pit; foiled waters wander slow

Through plains where Simois and Scamander went

To war with gods and heroes long ago.

Not yet to dark Cassandra lying low

In rich Mycenae do the Fates relent;

The bones of Agamemnon are a show,

And ruined is his royal monument.

The dust and awful treasures of the dead

Hath learning scattered wide; but vainly thee,

Homer, she meteth with her Lesbian lead,

And strives to rend thy songs, too blind is she

To know the crown on thine immortal head

Of indivisible supremacy.

A.L.

Athwart the sunrise of our western day

The form of great Achilles, high and clear,

Stands forth in arms, wielding the Pelian spear.

The sanguine tides of that immortal fray,

Swept on by gods, around him surge and sway,

Wherethrough the helms of many a warrior peer,

Strong men and swift, their tossing plumes uprear.

But stronger, swifter, goodlier he than they,

More awful, more divine. Yet mark anigh;

Some fiery pang hath rent his soul within,

Some hovering shade his brows encompasseth.

What gifts hath Fate for all his chivalry?

Even such as hearts heroic oftenest win;

Honour, a friend, anguish, untimely death.

E.M.

THE ILIAD OF HOMER

BOOK I.

How Agamemnon and Achilles fell out at the siege of Troy; and Achilles

withdrew himself from battle, and won from Zeus a pledge that his wrong

should be avenged on Agamemnon and the Achaians.

Sing, goddess, the wrath of Achilles Peleus' son, the ruinous wrath

that brought on the Achaians woes innumerable, and hurled down into

Hades many strong souls of heroes, and gave their bodies to be a prey

to dogs and all winged fowls; and so the counsel of Zeus wrought out

its accomplishment from the day when first strife parted Atreides king

of men and noble Achilles.

Who then among the gods set the twain at strife and variance? Even the

son of Leto and of Zeus; for he in anger at the king sent a sore plague

upon the host, that the folk began to perish, because Atreides had done

dishonour to Chryses the priest. For he had come to the Achaians' fleet

ships to win his daughter's freedom, and brought a ransom beyond

telling; and bare in his hands the fillet of Apollo the Far-darter upon

a golden staff; and made his prayer unto all the Achaians, and most of

all to the two sons of Atreus, orderers of the host: “Ye sons of Atreus

and all ye well-greaved Achaians, now may the gods that dwell in the

mansions of Olympus grant you to lay waste the city of Priam, and to

fare happily homeward; only set ye my dear child free, and accept the

ransom in reverence to the son of Zeus, far-darting Apollo.”

Then all the other Achaians cried assent, to reverence the priest and

accept his goodly ransom; yet the thing pleased not the heart of

Agamemnon son of Atreus, but he roughly sent him away, and laid stern

charge upon him, saying: “Let me not find thee, old man, amid the

hollow ships, whether tarrying now or returning again hereafter, lest

the staff and fillet of the god avail thee naught. And her will I not

set free; nay, ere that shall old age come on her in our house, in

Argos, far from her native land, where she shall ply the loom and serve

my couch. But depart, provoke me not, that thou mayest the rather go in

peace.”

So said he, and the old man was afraid and obeyed his word, and fared

silently along the shore of the loud-sounding sea. Then went that aged

man apart and prayed aloud to king Apollo, whom Leto of the fair locks

bare: “Hear me, god of the silver bow, that standest over Chryse and

holy Killa, and rulest Tenedos with might, O Smintheus! If ever I built

a temple gracious in thine eyes, or if ever I burnt to thee fat flesh

of thighs of bulls or goats, fulfil thou this my desire; let the

Danaans pay by thine arrows for my tears.”

So spake he in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him, and came down from

the peaks of Olympus wroth at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow

and covered quiver. And the arrows clanged upon his shoulders in wrath,

as the god moved; and he descended like to night. Then he sate him

aloof from the ships, and let an arrow fly; and there was heard a dread

clanging of the silver bow. First did he assail the mules and fleet

dogs, but afterward, aiming at the men his piercing dart, he smote; and

the pyres of the dead burnt continually in multitude.

Now for nine days ranged the god's shafts through the host; but on the

tenth Achilles summoned the folk to assembly, for in his mind did

goddess Hera of the white arms put the thought, because she had pity on

the Danaans when she beheld them perishing. Now when they had gathered

and were met in assembly, then Achilles fleet of foot stood up and

spake among them: “Son of Atreus, now deem I that we shall return

wandering home again—if verily we might escape death—if war at once and

pestilence must indeed ravage the Achaians. But come, let us now

inquire of some soothsayer or priest, yea, or an interpreter of

dreams—seeing that a dream too is of Zeus—who shall say wherefore

Phoebus Apollo is so wroth, whether he blame us by reason of vow or

hecatomb; if perchance he would accept the savour of lambs or

unblemished goats, and so would take away the pestilence from us.”

So spake he and sate him down; and there stood up before them Kalchas

son of Thestor, most excellent far of augurs, who knew both things that

were and that should be and that had been before, and guided the ships

of the Achaians to Ilios by his soothsaying that Phoebus Apollo

bestowed on him. He of good intent made harangue and spake amid them:

“Achilles, dear to Zeus, thou biddest me tell the wrath of Apollo, the

king that smiteth afar. Therefore will I speak; but do thou make

covenant with me, and swear that verily with all thy heart thou wilt

aid me both by word and deed. For of a truth I deem that I shall

provoke one that ruleth all the Argives with might, and whom the

Achaians obey. For a king is more of might when he is wroth with a

meaner man; even though for the one day he swallow his anger, yet doth

he still keep his displeasure thereafter in his breast till he

accomplish it. Consider thou, then, if thou wilt hold me safe.”

And Achilles fleet of foot made answer and spake to him: “Yea, be of

good courage, speak whatever soothsaying thou knowest; for by Apollo

dear to Zeus, him by whose worship thou, O Kalchas, declarest thy

soothsaying to the Danaans, no man while I live and behold light on

earth shall lay violent hands upon thee amid the hollow ships, no man

of all the Danaans, not even if thou mean Agamemnon, that now avoweth

him to be greatest far of the Achaians.”

Then was the noble seer of good courage, and spake: “Neither by reason

of a vow is he displeased, nor for any hecatomb, but for his priest's

sake to whom Agamemnon did despite, and set not his daughter free and

accepted not the ransom; therefore hath the Far-darter brought woes

upon us, yea, and will bring. Nor will he ever remove the loathly

pestilence from the Danaans till we have given the bright-eyed damsel

to her father, unbought, unransomed, and carried a holy hecatomb to

Chryse; then might we propitiate him to our prayer.”

So said he and sate him down, and there stood up before them the hero

son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, sore displeased; and his dark

heart within him was greatly filled with anger, and his eyes were like

flashing fire. To Kalchas first spake he with look of ill: “Thou seer

of evil, never yet hast thou told me the thing that is pleasant. Evil

is ever the joy of thy heart to prophesy, but never yet didst thou tell

any good matter nor bring to pass. And now with soothsaying thou makest

harangue among the Danaans, how that the Far-darter bringeth woes upon



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The Iliad of Homer, done into English prose (1) Die Ilias von Homer in englischer Prosa (1) The Iliad of Homer, done into English prose (1) Homeros'un İlyada'sı, İngilizce nesir haline getirildi (1)

The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Iliad, by Homer Электронная книга Project Gutenberg «Илиада» Гомера Homer tarafından yazılan İlyada'nın Gutenberg Projesi e-Kitabı

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere in the United States and

most other parts of the world at no cost and with almost no restrictions большинство других частей мира бесплатно и почти без ограничений

whatsoever. что угодно. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms

of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at

www.gutenberg.org. If you are not located in the United States, you

will have to check the laws of the country where you are located before müssen die Gesetze des Landes überprüfen, in dem Sie sich zuvor befinden

using this eBook. mit diesem eBook.

Title: The Iliad

Author: Homer

Translators: Andrew Lang, Walter Leaf and Ernest Meyers Übersetzer: Andrew Lang, Walter Leaf und Ernest Meyers

Release Date: February, 2002 [eBook #3059]

[Most recently updated: January 20, 2022]

Language: English

Character set encoding: UTF-8 Zeichensatzcodierung: UTF-8

Produced by: Sandra Stewart and Jim Tinsley

*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE ILIAD *** * START DES PROJEKTS GUTENBERG EBOOK DIE ILIAD *

THE DAS

ILIAD OF HOMER ILIADE VON HOMER

Done into English Prose Übersetzt in englische Prosa

by durch

Andrew Lang, M.A. Walter Leaf, Litt. D.

Late fellow of Merton College, Late fellow of Trinity College, Verstorbener Fellow des Merton College, Verstorbener Fellow des Trinity College, Merton Koleji'nin geç arkadaşı, Trinity Koleji'nin geç arkadaşı,

Oxford Cambridge Oxford Cambridge

and

Ernest Meyers, M.A.

Late fellow of Wadham College,

Oxford

_REVISED EDITION_ _ÜBERARBEITETE EDITION_

MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED

ST. MARTINS STREET, LONDON

1911

Contents Inhalt

PREFATORY NOTE.

THE ILIAD OF HOMER

BOOK I.

BOOK II.

BOOK III.

BOOK IV.

BOOK V.

BOOK VI.

BOOK VII.

BOOK VIII.

BOOK IX.

BOOK X.

BOOK XI.

BOOK XII.

BOOK XIII.

BOOK XIV.

BOOK XV.

BOOK XVI.

BOOK XVII.

BOOK XVIII.

BOOK XIX.

BOOK XX. BUCH XX.

BOOK XXI.

BOOK XXII.

BOOK XXIII.

BOOK XXIV.

PREFATORY NOTE. VORBEMERKUNG.

The execution of this version of the _Iliad_ has been entrusted to the Die Ausführung dieser Version des _Ilias_ ist dem anvertraut worden

three Translators in the following three parts: drei Übersetzer in den folgenden drei Teilen:

Books I. — IX. . . . . W. Leaf.

Books X. — XVI. . . . . A. Lang.

Books XVII. — XXIV. . . . . . E. Myers.

Each Translator is therefore responsible for his own portion; but the Jeder Übersetzer ist daher für seinen eigenen Anteil verantwortlich; aber die

whole has been revised by all three Translators, and the rendering of Das Ganze wurde von allen drei Übersetzern und der Wiedergabe überarbeitet

passages or phrases recurring in more than one portion has been Passagen oder Phrasen, die in mehr als einem Teil wiederkehren, wurden

determined after deliberation in common. nach gemeinsamer Beratung festgelegt. Even in these, however, a Aber auch in diesen ist a

certain elasticity has been deemed desirable. eine gewisse Elastizität wurde als wünschenswert erachtet.

On a few doubtful points, though very rarely, the opinion of two of the

translators has had to be adopted to the suppression of that held by

the third. Thus, for instance, the Translator of Books X. - XVI. Would

have preferred “c” and “us” to “k” and “os” in the spelling of all

proper names.

The text followed has been that of La Roche (Leipzig, 1873), except

where the adoption of a different reading has been specified in a

footnote. Where the balance of evidence, external and internal, has

seemed to the Translator to be against the genuineness of the passage,

such passage has been enclosed in brackets [].

The Translator of Books X. - XVI. has to thank Mr. R.W. Raper, Fellow

of Trinity College, Oxford, for his valuable aid in revising the

proof-sheets of these Books.

NOTE TO REVISED EDITION

In the present Edition the translation has been carefully revised

throughout, and numerous minor corrections have been made. The Notes at

the end of the volume have been, with a few exceptions, omitted; one of

the Translators hopes to publish very shortly a Companion to the Iliad

for English readers, which will deal fully with most of the points

therein referred to.

The use of square brackets has in this edition been restricted to

passages where there is external evidence, such as absence from the

best MSS., for believing in interpolation. One or two departures from

this Rule are noticed in footnotes.

_November_ 1891

The sacred soil of Ilios is rent

With shaft and pit; foiled waters wander slow

Through plains where Simois and Scamander went

To war with gods and heroes long ago.

Not yet to dark Cassandra lying low

In rich Mycenae do the Fates relent;

The bones of Agamemnon are a show,

And ruined is his royal monument.

The dust and awful treasures of the dead

Hath learning scattered wide; but vainly thee,

Homer, she meteth with her Lesbian lead,

And strives to rend thy songs, too blind is she

To know the crown on thine immortal head

Of indivisible supremacy.

A.L.

Athwart the sunrise of our western day

The form of great Achilles, high and clear,

Stands forth in arms, wielding the Pelian spear.

The sanguine tides of that immortal fray,

Swept on by gods, around him surge and sway,

Wherethrough the helms of many a warrior peer,

Strong men and swift, their tossing plumes uprear.

But stronger, swifter, goodlier he than they,

More awful, more divine. Yet mark anigh;

Some fiery pang hath rent his soul within,

Some hovering shade his brows encompasseth.

What gifts hath Fate for all his chivalry?

Even such as hearts heroic oftenest win;

Honour, a friend, anguish, untimely death.

E.M.

THE ILIAD OF HOMER

BOOK I.

How Agamemnon and Achilles fell out at the siege of Troy; and Achilles Agamemnon ve Akhilleus'un Truva kuşatmasında nasıl düştükleri; ve Aşil

withdrew himself from battle, and won from Zeus a pledge that his wrong kendini savaştan geri çekti ve Zeus'tan yanlış yaptığına dair bir söz kazandı.

should be avenged on Agamemnon and the Achaians. Agamemnon ve Akhalıların intikamı alınmalı.

Sing, goddess, the wrath of Achilles Peleus' son, the ruinous wrath Şarkı söyle, tanrıça, Akhilleus Peleus'un oğlunun gazabı, yıkıcı gazabı

that brought on the Achaians woes innumerable, and hurled down into

Hades many strong souls of heroes, and gave their bodies to be a prey

to dogs and all winged fowls; and so the counsel of Zeus wrought out

its accomplishment from the day when first strife parted Atreides king

of men and noble Achilles.

Who then among the gods set the twain at strife and variance? Even the

son of Leto and of Zeus; for he in anger at the king sent a sore plague

upon the host, that the folk began to perish, because Atreides had done

dishonour to Chryses the priest. For he had come to the Achaians' fleet

ships to win his daughter's freedom, and brought a ransom beyond

telling; and bare in his hands the fillet of Apollo the Far-darter upon

a golden staff; and made his prayer unto all the Achaians, and most of

all to the two sons of Atreus, orderers of the host: “Ye sons of Atreus

and all ye well-greaved Achaians, now may the gods that dwell in the

mansions of Olympus grant you to lay waste the city of Priam, and to

fare happily homeward; only set ye my dear child free, and accept the

ransom in reverence to the son of Zeus, far-darting Apollo.”

Then all the other Achaians cried assent, to reverence the priest and

accept his goodly ransom; yet the thing pleased not the heart of

Agamemnon son of Atreus, but he roughly sent him away, and laid stern

charge upon him, saying: “Let me not find thee, old man, amid the

hollow ships, whether tarrying now or returning again hereafter, lest

the staff and fillet of the god avail thee naught. And her will I not

set free; nay, ere that shall old age come on her in our house, in

Argos, far from her native land, where she shall ply the loom and serve

my couch. But depart, provoke me not, that thou mayest the rather go in

peace.”

So said he, and the old man was afraid and obeyed his word, and fared

silently along the shore of the loud-sounding sea. Then went that aged

man apart and prayed aloud to king Apollo, whom Leto of the fair locks

bare: “Hear me, god of the silver bow, that standest over Chryse and

holy Killa, and rulest Tenedos with might, O Smintheus! If ever I built

a temple gracious in thine eyes, or if ever I burnt to thee fat flesh

of thighs of bulls or goats, fulfil thou this my desire; let the

Danaans pay by thine arrows for my tears.”

So spake he in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him, and came down from

the peaks of Olympus wroth at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow

and covered quiver. And the arrows clanged upon his shoulders in wrath,

as the god moved; and he descended like to night. Then he sate him

aloof from the ships, and let an arrow fly; and there was heard a dread

clanging of the silver bow. First did he assail the mules and fleet

dogs, but afterward, aiming at the men his piercing dart, he smote; and

the pyres of the dead burnt continually in multitude.

Now for nine days ranged the god's shafts through the host; but on the

tenth Achilles summoned the folk to assembly, for in his mind did

goddess Hera of the white arms put the thought, because she had pity on

the Danaans when she beheld them perishing. Now when they had gathered

and were met in assembly, then Achilles fleet of foot stood up and

spake among them: “Son of Atreus, now deem I that we shall return

wandering home again—if verily we might escape death—if war at once and

pestilence must indeed ravage the Achaians. But come, let us now

inquire of some soothsayer or priest, yea, or an interpreter of

dreams—seeing that a dream too is of Zeus—who shall say wherefore

Phoebus Apollo is so wroth, whether he blame us by reason of vow or

hecatomb; if perchance he would accept the savour of lambs or

unblemished goats, and so would take away the pestilence from us.”

So spake he and sate him down; and there stood up before them Kalchas

son of Thestor, most excellent far of augurs, who knew both things that

were and that should be and that had been before, and guided the ships

of the Achaians to Ilios by his soothsaying that Phoebus Apollo

bestowed on him. He of good intent made harangue and spake amid them:

“Achilles, dear to Zeus, thou biddest me tell the wrath of Apollo, the

king that smiteth afar. Therefore will I speak; but do thou make

covenant with me, and swear that verily with all thy heart thou wilt

aid me both by word and deed. For of a truth I deem that I shall

provoke one that ruleth all the Argives with might, and whom the

Achaians obey. For a king is more of might when he is wroth with a

meaner man; even though for the one day he swallow his anger, yet doth

he still keep his displeasure thereafter in his breast till he

accomplish it. Consider thou, then, if thou wilt hold me safe.”

And Achilles fleet of foot made answer and spake to him: “Yea, be of

good courage, speak whatever soothsaying thou knowest; for by Apollo

dear to Zeus, him by whose worship thou, O Kalchas, declarest thy

soothsaying to the Danaans, no man while I live and behold light on

earth shall lay violent hands upon thee amid the hollow ships, no man

of all the Danaans, not even if thou mean Agamemnon, that now avoweth

him to be greatest far of the Achaians.”

Then was the noble seer of good courage, and spake: “Neither by reason

of a vow is he displeased, nor for any hecatomb, but for his priest's

sake to whom Agamemnon did despite, and set not his daughter free and

accepted not the ransom; therefore hath the Far-darter brought woes

upon us, yea, and will bring. Nor will he ever remove the loathly

pestilence from the Danaans till we have given the bright-eyed damsel

to her father, unbought, unransomed, and carried a holy hecatomb to

Chryse; then might we propitiate him to our prayer.”

So said he and sate him down, and there stood up before them the hero

son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, sore displeased; and his dark

heart within him was greatly filled with anger, and his eyes were like

flashing fire. To Kalchas first spake he with look of ill: “Thou seer

of evil, never yet hast thou told me the thing that is pleasant. Evil

is ever the joy of thy heart to prophesy, but never yet didst thou tell

any good matter nor bring to pass. And now with soothsaying thou makest

harangue among the Danaans, how that the Far-darter bringeth woes upon

×

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