What kind of content would you add in a new language for a new beginner?

hel9287 us United States

Hi all,

I am working on getting Gujarati stories and content translated to help support this language. There are already 60 mini stories that have some content, but I wanted to branch out into some more interesting content to keep beginners engaged. Currently, I am having someone start with the alphabet and some fairytales like Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast (beginner 2-intermediate 1 level), but what kind of content would be both interesting and helpful for a beginner one level?

January 01 at 18:06
  • scgrant176 us United States

    I like reading about local history, food, cultural activities, hygiene practices, local customs, shopping, religion, etc. Basically, everyday life.

    January 01 at 18:42
  • Swedishfinngermanophile fi Finland

    Since I mostly study European languages my study routine and needs are very different to what they would be if I studied, say Gujarat. However I really enjoy the "Steve speaks to native speakers" podcast types of lessons. In these he speaks about various topics food, traveling, stories relating to the interlocutors life, etc.

    January 01 at 18:52
  • chytran us United States

    I like content with lots of repetitional words talking about how to learn the "targeted language" in the actual language. An example is the Spanish podcast "Espanol automatic" talking about how to learn the Spanish language in the actual language. Also, french's "Francais Authentique" which helps talk about giving tips on how to learn the language in the actual language. After completing about 70 "espanol automatic" podcast on lingq, I believe that I was able to understand a lot of what was said in youtube vlogs and etc. Roughly about 80 percent or maybe a little more. Only my opinion of course.

    January 01 at 19:21
    • norwegianblue us United States

      Chytran, thank you for making me aware of Espanol Autimatico. I think your idea of using content with words talking about learning the language makes a lot of sense! Well, that is, if you enjoy that type of content, and now that I've tried it, I must say I do! I imported "El General en Su Laberinto" by Gabriel Marquez Garcia because I've always wanted to read that book in the original language. Although that activity was enjoyable and made me come back for more, the problem is that it's written mostly in the past sense, so most of my verb Lingqs are are in the preterite form. Nothing wrong with that from a literary viewpoint of course, but perhaps not the most helpful at the beginner levels. So another way of saying that is that perhaps the book I set out to read is a bit to far beyond my level. As per your recommendation, I checked out Espanol Autimatico, and I found that not only did I enjoy it (important!), but the words and phrases I'm picking up are a bit more useful in everyday conversation compared to the book I was reading. Also, with Espanol Autimatico being more at beginner level, I'm able to mark off many more words as "known" than was the case with the book. Just wanted to let you know that your post helped my Linqq studies quite a bit, and maybe this feedback will help someone else!

      January 13 at 23:22
      • zazarickoty dz Algeria

        I like content with lots of repetitional words talking about how to learn the "targeted language" in the actual language. An example is the Spanish podcast "Espanol automatic" talking about how to learn the Spanish language in the actual language. Also, french's "Francais Authentique" which helps talk about giving tips on how to learn the language in the actual language. After completing about 70 "espanol automatic" podcast on lingq, I believe that I was able to understand a lot of what was said in youtube vlogs and etc. Roughly about 80 percent or maybe a little more. Only my opinion of course.ImportReply

        January 16 at 12:41
  • hel9287 us United States

    I have a few fairy tales in the works, another set of audio for learning the alphabet, and a start on Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. The 60 short stories are mostly a day in the life type stories, so I was trying to branch out on the available content.

    January 01 at 23:01
  • Car2017 de Germany

    I think it would make sense to spend a lot of time on the script. I also like cultural information a lot.

    January 02 at 09:59
  • Artmanx ee Estonia

    Songs, learn song lyrics and sing along

    January 06 at 21:40
  • Chris nz New Zealand

    I think natural conversations between two or people are extremely useful and necessary, in addition to the literary content and suggestions already made.

    January 06 at 22:51
    • brucenator us United States

      I absolutely agree with Chris on this point. Natural conversation far outweighs anything scripted.

      If you could do a unique performance podcast, perhaps broken into short segments, where a couple of interesting and dynamic people, along with special guests, discuss any of the topics already suggested by the other members (history and historical figures, culture and cultural activities, local customs and beliefs, local and national news and events, special problems facing the region they are from or where they live now, science, tv and movies, food and cooking, hygiene, travel, shopping, things they find strange or unusual, comedy, or anything else that they are interested in or excited about) and then write the scripts based on that conversation, that would be better than trying to come up with content where everything is scripted and sounds like it.

      Check out this "council of five":

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k22xntLWSo

      January 07 at 04:22
  • ricardopietrobon us United States

    I upload a lot of content that I buy on Kindle, and so my answer reflects that: I like to start with graded readers. I see that you're learning Spanish, and although I haven't studied that language (Portuguese is my first language, and so Spanish is kind of easy), I bet there is a ton of graded books for Spanish. Check this: https://goo.gl/LP8xfg

    January 11 at 03:22
  • WinterShaker gb United Kingdom

    I got a lot of use out of the 'Podcasts met Fasulye' for Dutch, which I think were recorded and transcribed specifically for LingQ. The format: one native Dutch speaker, one who had learned it as a young adult, having ten-minute unscripted conversations (but speaking at a manageable pace) on pre-agreed topics such as various aspects of Dutch culture, their own language learning experiences, their other hobbies etc. If you could find someone who also speaks Gujarati and would be willing to do something similar, I expect that would be very useful.

    January 12 at 13:45