Comprehensible input for new grammar features

rcwnsr us United States

I'm curious if anyone has been able to learn new grammar features (grammar that is not in a language they already know) with little or no grammatical explanations/practice.

I've been reading a lot in Ukrainian for the past 10 days, and my vocabulary has sharply increased, but my understanding of noun and adjective cases is still very poor. Meanwhile, I have been picking up on concepts that also appear in English with almost no outside help (prepositions, tenses, helper verbs, participles). Is it just too difficult to learn grammatical features that don't exist in your native language (or that can't be expressed well by google translate)?

Perhaps new grammatical features that don't translate into your native language (or a known language) don't qualify as comprehensible input because you can't understand them.

I would love to know if someone has a strategy for "noticing" new features that doesn't involve memorizing tables, doing exercises, or tagging 100s/1000s of words.

September 16 at 00:08
  • evgueny40 ru Ruská federace

    It isn't possible to ubndersrtand in a go all distuictive features of a new language.

    For example I was very confused at the beginning of learning Turkish because of the abundance of the affixes at the end of words and couldn't understand anything even in the very simple texts. But it's much better now.

    The English grammar is also not so simple for foreigners, especially the verb - 16 verb tenses in Active voice plus 10 tenses in Passive! But in any case it's easier to make up first sentences in English than in German or in Russian because of their declension of nouns and pronouns.

    There are also some specific granmmatical structures in Slavonic languages in comparison with English - and you need some time to understand and to adopt them before using them.

    The Russian grammar is close to the Ukrainian Grammar so I can give some examples in Russian:

    I have - У меня есть

    My name is- Меня зовут

    he is sad - Ему грустно.

    But if you see and hear many times in Russian texts: У меня есть книга. У него есть машина. Есть у тебя время? etc, you start to understand that it is something with the verb 'to have'.

    I don't know if there is anything about the Ukrainian grammar here, but you can use in lingq.com a lot of my Russian courses for beginners to understand the specifics of the main principles of Slavic grammar at all, for example:

    ГРАММАТИЧЕСКИЕ МОДЕЛИ, БАЗОВЫЕ МОДЕЛИ, ПЕРВЫЕ ШАГИ, ГЛАГОЛЫ ДВИЖЕНИЯ, РУССКИЙ С НУЛЯ and also my course with the grammar exercises УПРАЖНЕНИЯ ПО ГРАММАТИКЕ.

    September 16 at 05:24